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Long Island job levels in November

The total, non-farm sector job count on Long Island fell 900 to more than 1.353 million in November 2017 compared with a year earlier, according to the state Labor Department. Leading the declines were the trade, transportation and utilities sector, which was down 4,400 jobs; professional and business services, which fell by 4,000, and manufacturing, which fell by 2,000. Making up for some of the loss was the private educational and health services sector, which increased 8,600, and leisure and hospitality, which rose by 2,600 compared with October 2016. Click on the trend lines below for details on the 10 sectors going back to 1990. To eliminate some of the lines, click on the sector name in the color key. The table below gives details for the 2017 and 2016 levels, and you can see more Long Island economic indicators or read about the job trends.

Jobs in the 10 sectors on Long Island

More detailed breakdown of 2017 vs. 2016

Industry            (job levels in thousands)Nov. 2017Nov. 2016Change in year
TOTAL NONFARM1,353.11,354.0-0.1%
TOTAL PRIVATE1,152.41,153.2-0.1%
Total Goods Producing 146.8148.6-1.2%
   Construction, Natural Resources, Mining 77.176.90.3%
         Specialty Trade Contractors 56.754.54.0%
   Manufacturing69.771.7-2.8%
      Durable Goods 38.039.7-4.3%
      Non-Durable Goods 31.732.0-0.9%
Total Service Providing1,206.31,205.40.1%
Total Private Service-Providing1,005.61,004.60.1%
   Trade, Transportation, and Utilities284.2288.6-1.5%
      Wholesale Trade 71.673.0-1.9%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods 34.534.6-0.3%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 27.227.20.0%
      Retail Trade 166.6170.7-2.4%
         Building Material and Garden Equipment 13.313.02.3%
         Food and Beverage Stores 37.036.70.8%
            Grocery Stores 30.430.30.3%
         Health and Personal Care Stores 13.713.51.5%
         Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores 19.520.4-4.4%
         General Merchandise Stores 29.129.5-1.4%
            Department Stores 22.623.1-2.2%
      Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities 46.044.92.4%
         Utilities 4.84.80.0%
         Transportation and Warehousing 41.240.12.7%
            Couriers and Messengers 6.46.40.0%
   Information18.519.2-3.6%
         Broadcasting (except Internet) 1.01.00.0%
         Telecommunications 8.68.60.0%
   Financial Activities70.571.7-1.7%
      Finance and Insurance 53.053.1-0.2%
         Credit Intermediation and Related Activities 20.220.3-0.5%
            Depository Credit Intermediation 11.411.5-0.9%
         Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 26.026.6-2.3%
      Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 17.518.6-5.9%
         Real Estate 13.914.1-1.4%
   Professional and Business Services 177.1181.1-2.2%
      Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 81.980.71.5%
            Legal Services 17.318.8-8.0%
            Accounting, Tax Prep., Bookkpng., & Payroll Svcs. 14.714.05.0%
      Management of Companies and Enterprises 16.416.21.2%
      Admin. & Supp. and Waste Manage. & Remed. Svcs. 78.884.2-6.4%
   Education and Health Services275.7267.13.2%
      Educational Services 44.543.42.5%
      Health Care and Social Assistance 231.2223.73.4%
         Ambulatory Health Care Services 91.588.43.5%
         Hospitals 66.864.33.9%
         Nursing and Residential Care Facilities 35.434.13.8%
         Social Assistance 37.536.91.6%
   Leisure and Hospitality120.3117.72.2%
      Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 21.819.114.1%
         Amusement, Gambling, and Recreation Industries 16.114.610.3%
      Accommodation and Food Services 98.598.6-0.1%
         Food Services and Drinking Places 92.993.8-1.0%
   Other Services 59.359.20.2%
         Personal and Laundry Services 23.823.22.6%
Government 200.7200.80.0%
   Federal Government 15.916.3-2.5%
   State Government 25.325.30.0%
      State Government Education 14.213.64.4%
      State Government Hospitals 1.31.4-7.1%
   Local Government 159.5159.20.2%
      Local Government Education 108.1107.50.6%
      Local Government Hospitals 2.92.90.0%

The deductions many Long Islanders take on federal taxes

Nassau County ranks sixth in the nation and Suffolk is 15th in the percentage of home owners paying more than $10,000 in property taxes, according to Attom Data Solutions, a company that tracks real estate data. Roughly half the homes in Nassau and nearly a third of the homes in Suffolk surpass the $10,000 level for property taxes, one of the deductions being altered in the tax legislation before Congress.

Many of the counties that rank higher than Nassau or Suffolk have a smaller number of homes overall. Here’s how they break down.

Homes over or under the $10,000 property tax level

County, State$0 – $10,000Over $10,000Percent over $10,000
Westchester, NY45,294125,19073.4%
Luna, NM4,86110,69168.7%
Rockland, NY29,09043,62260.0%
Mathews, VA2,2332,66554.4%
New York, NY56,99563,02352.5%
NASSAU, NY172,745176,94650.6%
Bergen, NJ130,142126,09649.2%
Essex, NJ79,40174,54048.4%
Union, NJ73,49957,26043.8%
Morris, NJ93,83762,26939.9%
Passaic, NJ66,98443,49939.4%
Hunterdon, NJ27,42016,04236.9%
Somerset, NJ67,26139,16136.8%
Marin, CA50,01826,78134.9%
SUFFOLK, NY316,744155,59232.9%
Fairfield, CT177,99276,57330.1%
Santa Clara, CA300,693121,18628.7%
Lake, IL157,47661,16328.0%
Monmouth, NJ160,28958,85226.9%
Mercer, NJ82,99828,32825.4%

State and local tax deductions on LI by income bracket

More than 250,000 Long Islanders making between $100,000 and $200,000 take deductions on their federal returns for state and local taxes, according to data provided by the IRS. The average deduction taken in that income bracket is $17,868 in Nassau County and $16,786 in Suffolk County. That income group is the largest taking such deductions, although filers in other income brackets also take advantage of the deductions. (You can read more about what the new tax system might mean for Long Island home owners.


Taxpayers in general

While the $100,000 to $200,000 bracket was the largest for taking state and local deductions, the largest group overall for taxpayers on Long Island are those making up to $25,000 a year. (Not included in these charts and tables is a small percentage of tax filers (9,640 in Nassau and 7,670 in Suffolk), who had adjusted gross incomes of less than $1 and paid no tax.)


Property tax deductions

Nearly matching the breakdown on those taking state and local tax deductions, the largest group on Long Island taking property tax deductions on their federal returns is the $100,000 to $200,000 bracket.


Mortgage interest deductions

Again, nearly matching the breakdown on those taking state and local tax deductions, the largest group on Long Island taking mortgage interest deductions is also the $100,000 to $200,000 bracket.


Details on what people earn or deduct, on average, in each bracket

The category of state and local taxes includes state and local income tax, sales tax and real estate, or property taxes, as well as some smaller categories of tax.

INCOME REPORTEDNassau
returns
Nassau average
amount
Suffolk
returns
Suffolk average
amount
  $1 up to $25,000 212,040 $11,479 246,610 $11,988
  $25,000 under $50,000 124,030 $37,348 153,660 $37,075
  $50,000 under $75,000 89,460 $62,671 100,650 $62,466
  $75,000 under $100,000 66,900 $87,858 73,750 $87,800
  $100,000 under $200,000 137,430 $141,746 141,070 $139,762
  $200,000 or more 74,480 $585,426 53,410 $506,144
DEDUCTIONS TAKEN FOR: Nassau
returns
Nassau average
amount
Suffolk
returns
Suffolk average
amount
All state and local tax
  $1 up to $25,000 21,550 $8,092 23,510 $7,130
  $25,000 under $50,000 39,620 $8,387 45,880 $7,769
  $50,000 under $75,000 49,420 $10,105 55,360 $9,474
  $75,000 under $100,000 49,870 $12,460 54,860 $11,749
  $100,000 under $200,000 126,570 $17,868 128,920 $16,786
  $200,000 or more 73,720 $63,987 52,810 $52,945
  All income brackets 360,750 $23,856 361,340 $18,413
State/local income tax    
  $1 up to $25,000 7,270 $1,885 8,460 $1,449
  $25,000 under $50,000 26,620 $1,975 31,180 $1,841
  $50,000 under $75,000 39,620 $3,199 44,680 $3,025
  $75,000 under $100,000 42,630 $4,557 46,720 $4,382
  $100,000 under $200,000 116,650 $7,909 118,080 $7,616
  $200,000 or more 72,010 $46,200 51,110 $38,623
  All income brackets 304,800 $15,213 300,230 $10,934
State/local general sales tax    
  $1 up to $25,000 12,550 $614 13,180 $707
  $25,000 under $50,000 11,950 $911 13,480 $1,181
  $50,000 under $75,000 9,110 $1,172 9,930 $1,393
  $75,000 under $100,000 6,710 $1,422 7,600 $1,601
  $100,000 under $200,000 9,180 $1,859 10,130 $2,083
  $200,000 or more 1,530 $2,940 1,560 $3,281
  All income brackets 51,030 $1,183 55,880 $1,386
Real estate tax    
  $1 up to $25,000 16,650 $9,020 18,150 $7,840
  $25,000 under $50,000 27,490 $9,514 33,540 $8,197
  $50,000 under $75,000 36,630 $9,651 43,920 $8,369
  $75,000 under $100,000 40,150 $10,203 47,090 $8,935
  $100,000 under $200,000 112,350 $11,563 118,640 $10,322
  $200,000 or more 69,530 $19,653 50,390 $16,028
  All income brackets 302,800 $12,683 311,730 $10,387
Mortgage interest    
  $1 up to $25,000 8,900 $7,270 10,920 $7,260
  $25,000 under $50,000 17,530 $7,810 23,730 $7,434
  $50,000 under $75,000 25,870 $8,077 33,510 $7,598
  $75,000 under $100,000 30,260 $8,722 37,810 $8,246
  $100,000 under $200,000 91,550 $10,340 101,070 $9,811
  $200,000 or more 55,410 $15,168 41,960 $14,077
  All income brackets 229,520 $10,725 249,000 $9,656

IRS data is for the 2015 tax year, the latest available. Attom data is for current year. JavaScript charts via amCharts.

How do you feel about the GOP tax overhaul?

Long Islanders most likely will be forced to cope with an almost totally new federal tax code, one that even Republican congressional tax writers behind the legislation acknowledge creates winners and losers.

Long Island overall loses big, say local business leaders, lawmakers and economists, because the bill eliminates the full deduction for state and local taxes, called SALT — which is why every member of Congress who represents the Island said they will vote no on the bill Tuesday.

How do you feel about the GOP tax overhaul? Tell us below.

Submit a response

Thank you for your submission. Check back soon to see if it was posted.

Please respond in 250 words or less. Your response becomes the property of Newsday Media Group. It will be edited and may be republished in all media.

Property Tax – Landing Page

Part 1 Mangano’s overhaul created $1.7B property tax shift in Nassau The Nassau Tax Shift Explained Why neighbors with almost identical homes have different tax bills See how Part 2 Nassau tax firms benefit from Mangano’s appeals reform program Part 3 Is there a fix for Nassau’s $6B property tax system?
How does your tax bill compare to others in Nassau?

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Nassau clients of big appeal firms got larger assessment reductions in 2012, 2013

Thousands of homeowners who challenged assessments on their own fared worse than those with similar appeals who were represented by two big tax firms.

Nassau STAR errors benefit school district taxpayers, Newsday review shows

The county miscalculated nearly a million exemptions, which were small but added up to hundreds of thousands of dollars over seven years.

Even among Nassau tax assessment winners, some lost out

A county program called Carry Forward virtually guaranteed some homeowners 5% to 9% decreases each year — but those who didn’t qualify paid a price.

Nassau tax assessments: How even some winners lost out

Not filing an appeal for several years was one reason but another involved the varying criteria of the Carry Forward process, which the county barely publicized.

Nassau assessment system affects commercial properties, too

Business owners who have not filed a challenge — whether they thought they were already underassessed or were not fully informed of the advantages of appealing — have been hit even harder than homeowners who haven’t filed.

Nassau delays property reassessment planned for 2018

The halt means taxpayers who have not been awarded one of the overhaul’s substantial assessment reductions will continue to pay for the tax savings of those who have been.

Video: How to grieve your Nassau taxes

Newsday investigative reporter Matt Clark walks you through the steps you can take if you want to challenge your Nassau County property tax assessment online at no cost.

How do I appeal my assessment?

You can file an appeal for free on the county’s Assessment Review Commission website.

Record number challenge Nassau tax assessments for first time

Thousands of Nassau property owners who had not challenged their assessments since the process was overhauled in 2010 filed appeals this year.

Nassau County extends tax-grievance deadline until March 10

Nassau extended the deadline for accepting property tax assessment appeals, a day after Newsday reported the system has created stark differences in tax bills.

What venture funds did for 10 startups with Long Island ties

Eight of the 10 Long Island affiliated companies that received $50,000 each from the Accelerate Long Island Seed Fund, matched by the the Long Island Emerging Technology Fund, went on to receive an additional $23.7 million in investment in recent years, although not evenly, according to data compiled by Newsday reporter James T. Madore.

Codagenix Inc. of Farmingdale, a vaccine maker, received the most additional money, $11.6 million, while one company received less than $250,000. You can read more about the investments here.


Investments in 10 new companies with ties to Long Island


Details on the companies

The institutions affiliated with these companies are Stony Brook University (SBU), Cold Spring Harbor Lab (CSHL), Northwell Health and Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Additional investments are as of 12/1/2017. This data posted on Dec. 15, 2017.

Company name (location)What they do (Institution affiliation)FoundedTime of ALI/LIETF investmentInvestment by ALI and LIETFAdditional investmentsJobs at time of ALI/LIETF investmentJobs as of 12/1/17
Codagenix Inc. (Farmingdale)Vaccines (SBU)20122014$100,000 $11,600,000 28
DepYmed (Farmingdale)Drugs (CSHL/Northwell)20142015$100,000 $2,037,000 11
Envisagenics Inc. (Manhattan)Software for drug development (CSHL)20142015$100,000 $3,442,000 28
Goddard Labs Inc. (Manhattan)Food testing/consulting and research services (SBU)20112014$100,000 $0 11
PolyNova CardioVascular Inc. (Stony Brook)Prosthetic heart value (SBU)20122014$100,000 $245,000 10
Scannerside/Right Dose Inc. (Port Washington)Software for monitoring radiation dosages (SBU)20112015$100,000 $0 13
Green Sulfcrete LLC (Melville)Concrete made from recycled sulfur (BNL)20122014$100,000 $1,833,000 33
Symbiotic Health Inc. (Roslyn Heights)Drugs (Northwell)20132015$100,000 $850,000 22
SynchroPET Inc. (Stony Brook)Scanners (BNL)20112014$100,000 $1,160,000 18
Traverse Biosciences Inc. (Stony Brook)Drugs (SBU)20132014$100,000 $2,525,000 11

2017 in review

We started the year swearing in a new president and ended it with major shifts in both the U.S. tax system and local politics. Violence by members of the MS-13 gang left Long Island families brokenhearted while the nation suffered its deadliest mass shooting in modern history. Billy Joel welcomed concertgoers to the revamped Nassau Coliseum and we said goodbye to celebrities like Tom Petty. Explore the memorable moments of 2017 here.

Long Island's top 25 stories

Top news stories

Long Island's top 25 stories

Historic political elections and political corruption charges. The opening of a casino and the grand reopening of the Nassau Coliseum. Those were just some of the local stories that defined 2017.

Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

Top LI pictures of 2017

Photos for posterity

Top LI pictures of 2017

Friends and family say goodbye to loved ones lost to violence. A set of triplets undergo a historic surgery to correct a rare skull condition. See the stunning and emotional images taken on LI this year.

Steve Pfost

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Video Year in Review

Relive 2017 in under 7 minutes

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Newsday's notable covers of 2017

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Newsday's notable covers of 2017

See a collection of the most notable Newsday covers of the year.

How Newsday covered 2017

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See some of the biggest local, national and international stories of the year.

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Stories that were 'so Long Island'

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Stories that were 'so Long Island'

From a fake road sign telling drivers to speed up to a traveler's viral response to an empty LIRR car, these stories will have you shaking your head and muttering, 'That's so Long Island.'

Facebook / Lenny Sinacore

LI kids who found fame in 2017

Local prodigies

LI kids who found fame in 2017

2017 was a good year to get 15 minutes of fame for these select local kids, including a young voice actor.

Nickelodeon

Women who left a mark

Making headlines

Women who left a mark

These Long Island women and girls made an impact in 2017, including a young author and a groundbreaking athlete.

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Everything the board wrote in 2017

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Memorable images from President Trump's inauguration, the Manchester Arena attack, the #MeToo movement and more.

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The matriarch of a Long Island political family, a budding music star and a professor who battled brain cancer are among the Long Islanders we lost this year.

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Long Islanders who made us proud

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Read about the students who helped bring a boy to the United States to receive lifesaving heart surgery and more tales of acts of kindness and amazing feats Long Islanders performed.

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Sports

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We said goodbye to athletes, coaches and personalities.

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Top sports photos of 2017

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This year’s closings included a bar featuring live music and Beatles memorabilia and a landmark waterfront restaurant that went on the market for $975,000.

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2017 proved another good year for diners looking for good food at decent prices.

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From the Five Towns out to the North Fork, fine dining proved exceptionally fine in 2017.

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Penn Station track work: How it will compare to ‘Summer of Hell’

Will it be a “Winter of Worry” and a “Spring of Service Disruptions” after the “Summer of Hell”?

The latest round of Amtrak infrastructure improvements at Penn Station begins Jan. 5; and while the public may not have the catchy nickname given to similar track work done over the summer, it does now have the details.

The LIRR released its service changes, effective Monday, Jan. 8, and expected to last until May 28. Overall, officials say the impact will be much less than it was over the summer, with eight of 184 rush hour trains to be rerouted, compared to 32 over the summer.

Here’s a line-by-line comparison of what’s expected to happen compared with the summer.


TRACKS OUT OF SERVICE

Winter: 1

Summer: 3 – 5


PERIOD OF WORK

Winter: 21 weeks

Summer: 8 weeks


RUSH-HOUR SERVICE AFFECTED

Winter: 5 percent

Summer: 20 percent


MORNING RUSH-HOUR TRAINS AFFECTED

Winter: 5

Summer: 15

To reduce the impact of the rerouted trains, the LIRR is adding two trains in the morning. It is also adding cars to five trains to increase seating capacity.


EVENING RUSH-HOUR TRAINS AFFECTED

Winter: 3

Summer: 17

To reduce the impact of the rerouted trains, the LIRR is adding three trains in the evening. In addition, two evening rush hour trains will be combined with alternative trains departing within 11 minutes and serving all affected stations.


TRAINS REROUTED THROUGH ALTERNATE STATIONS

Winter: Eight rush-hour trains that usually terminate or originate at Penn Station will be diverted to Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn or Hunterspoint Avenue in Queens.

Summer: Twenty-three trains diverted to or from Atlantic Terminal, Hunterspoint Avenue or Jamaica in Queens.


AREAS OF PENN STATION AFFECTED

Winter: Tracks 15, 18, and a “turnout” — or an arrangement of rails and switches — at the eastern end of the tracks feeding the station.

Summer: “A” interlocking area, Track 10, plus tracks not typically used by the LIRR


ALTERNATE SERVICES PROVIDED

Winter: None

Summer: Ferries to and from Glen Cove; Buses from various locations on the Island; reduced fares for rerouted trains.


Here’s the full list of schedule changes:

BABYLON BRANCH

— The LIRR will add a new train departing Freeport at 5:43 a.m. and stopping at Baldwin, Rockville Centre and Jamaica and arriving at Penn Station at 6:24 a.m.

— The 6:56 a.m. train from Wantagh, which currently stops at Bellmore and Merrick before running express to Penn Station, will add a stop at Jamaica to allow for connecting service to Penn Station, then will continue to Atlantic Terminal, where it will arrive at 7:45 a.m.

— The LIRR will add two cars to the 7:35 a.m. train from Babylon making all stops to Seaford then running express to Jamaica and Penn Station. This train will be lengthened to 12 cars, from the usual 10, adding more than 200 extra seats.

— The 7:41 a.m. train from Merrick, which currently stops at Freeport and Baldwin before running express to Penn Station, will add a stop at Jamaica to allow customers to change for connecting service to Penn Station, then will continue to Hunterspoint Avenue, where it will arrive at 8:25 a.m.

— The 8:25 a.m. train from Freeport, which currently stops at Baldwin, Rockville Centre and Jamaica en route to Penn Station, will be rerouted to Atlantic Terminal, where it will arrive at 9:07 a.m. Connecting service is available at Jamaica.

— The LIRR will add two cars to the 4:34 p.m. train from Penn Station, running express to Seaford then making all stops to Babylon, lengthening the train to 12 cars from the usual 10, adding more than 200 extra seats.

— To provide a later departure time for customers using Hunterspoint Avenue and traveling on the Babylon, Hempstead, Long Beach and Ronkonkoma Branches, the LIRR will add a new train departing Hunterspoint Avenue at 7:02 p.m. and stopping at Rockville Centre and Baldwin en route to arriving at Freeport at 7:42 p.m. This train makes connections at Jamaica for trains bound for Babylon, Hempstead, Long Beach and Ronkonkoma.

FAR ROCKAWAY BRANCH

— The 8:10 a.m. train from Far Rockaway, which currently makes all local stops to Valley Stream, then Jamaica, Kew Gardens, Forest Hills and Penn Station, will be rerouted to Hunterspoint Avenue, where it will arrive at 9:04 a.m. This train will not stop at Kew Gardens or Forest Hills. Connecting service is available at Jamaica.

— The train that currently originates at 5:32 p.m. at Penn Station and terminates at Far Rockaway at 6:24 p.m., will instead originate at Jamaica at 5:52 p.m. Customers at Penn Station can connect with this train by boarding the 5:23 p.m. Long Beach Branch train or the 5:24 p.m. train to Freeport and changing at Jamaica.

HEMPSTEAD BRANCH

— The 5:38 p.m. train from Penn Station, due into Hempstead at 6:36 p.m., will originate at Atlantic Terminal at 5:47 p.m. Customers from Penn Station can connect with this train by boarding the 5:33 p.m. train to Hicksville and changing at Jamaica.

— The 7:05 p.m. train from Penn Station, due into Hempstead at 7:56 p.m., will originate at Atlantic Terminal at 7:10 p.m. Customers from Penn Station can connect with this train by boarding the 7:08 p.m. Babylon Branch train and changing at Jamaica.

LONG BEACH BRANCH

— The 8:03 a.m. train from Long Beach, making all local stops to Lynbrook before running express to Penn Station, will add a stop at Jamaica to allow for connecting service to Penn Station, then will continue to Atlantic Terminal, where it will arrive at 8:54 a.m.

— The LIRR will add two cars to the 8:08 a.m. train from Long Beach, making all local stops to Jamaica, then Woodside and Penn Station. The train will be lengthened to 12 cars from the usual 10, adding more than 200 seats.

PORT JEFFERSON BRANCH

— The 5:06 p.m. train from Penn Station, which runs express to Syosset then stops at Cold Spring Harbor and Huntington, will not operate. Customers will be able to board the 5:17 p.m. train from Penn Station, which runs express to Westbury, then stops at Hicksville, Syosset, Cold Spring Harbor and Huntington.

PORT WASHINGTON BRANCH

— The LIRR will add a new afternoon train departing Penn Station at 3:40 p.m., stopping at Woodside, then making all stops to Great Neck, where it will arrive at 4:15 p.m.

— The 5:50 p.m. train from Penn Station, which runs express to Bayside, then stops at Douglaston, Little Neck and Great Neck, will not operate. Customers will be able to board the 5:56 p.m. train from Penn Station, which makes all local stops to Great Neck. The 5:56 p.m. train will have four cars added, lengthening the train to 12 cars from the usual eight, adding more than 400 seats.

— The LIRR will add two cars to the 7:27 p.m. train from Penn Station, due into Port Washington at 8:04 p.m., lengthening the train to 12 cars from the usual 10, adding more than 200 seats.

RONKONKOMA BRANCH

— The LIRR will add a new early morning train departing Farmingdale at 5:05 a.m. making local stops along the Main Line, and arriving at Penn Station at 6 a.m.

— The LIRR will add a new early afternoon train departing Penn Station at 1:49 p.m., then stopping at Woodside, Jamaica, Mineola, Hicksville, Bethpage, and all stops to Ronkonkoma, where it will arrive at 3:07 p.m.

Snow Totals

Here are the latest available snow depth measurements for the tri-state area provided by the National Weather Service, Upton office. They are unofficial, unverified observations taken by cooperative observers, Skywarn Spotters and media. The National Weather Service does not update all communities continuously and some readings may be several hours old or not updated.

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Census data on speaking English, ancestry and getting to work

Census data indicate that fewer Long Islanders are speaking English at home, or speaking it well, that some ancestry groups are declining, and that it’s taking everyone on Long Island and in the greater New York area longer on average to commute to and from work.

Those are among the findings about life on Long Island from one-year and five-year data from the American Community Survey compared to the previous periods. After checking the charts below you can read about Long Island’s Census data.

Fewer speaking English at home, or well

The Census for years has been illustrating changes in Long Island’s population. One indicator in the newest data is the percentage of people age 5 and older not speaking English at home — 21.1 percent nationally from 2012-2016, up from 20.3 percent from 2007-2011. Here are the percentages for Nassau and Suffolk, which have margins of error of 0.2 or 0.3 percentage points, indicated by the small brackets at the top of each bar.


Smaller percentages for top three European ancestry groups

Residents who reported ancestry from Italy, Ireland and German have long had the highest percentages on Long Island, but all three saw smaller numbers in the 2012-2016 Census data.


And the daily commute gets longer

One-year data from the American Community Survey shows that the commute to and from work has been taking consistently longer for Long Islanders and for people throughout the New York area. Nationally the average is 26.1 minutes. The times charted here have a margin of error of 0.1 or 0.2 of a minute. In the chart on the right are the commuting methods most often claimed for 2012-16: driving alone, public transportation or carpooling. These statistics have a margin of error of 0.2 to 0.4 percentage points.


JavaScript charts via amCharts.

Editorials Year in Review

It’s been a busy year.

The nation inaugurated a new president. Federal indictments targeted top politicians in Nassau and Suffolk counties. A wave of disclosures exposed sexual harassment and misconduct by prominent men across industries and politics. LIRR commuters dealt with the Summer of Hell.

This year, the editorial board wrote more than 400 editorials – taking positions on the news, politics and policies that impact Long Islanders. Editorials are the consensus position of the editorial board. They are written and reported independently of the newsroom; news editors, reporters and photographers are not involved in the creation of this material.

With each argument we publish, we strive to be a reasoned and pragmatic advocate for what is best for Long Island. We hope readers will use this index of the editorials written in 2017 as a way to easily research our priors positions, suggest additional topics to us that are not being recognized and to hold us accountable for our views.

Want to respond to something we wrote? Send a letter to the editor.

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