Long Island job levels in September

The total, non-farm sector job count on Long Island rose by 8,800 to more than 1.34 million in September 2017 compared to a year earlier, according to the state’s Labor Department. Leading the increases were the private educational and health services sector, which rose by 9,500, and leisure and hospitality, which rose by 2,000 compared to September 2016. Construction, mining and natural resources lost 2,300 jobs. Click on the trend lines below for details on the 10 sectors going back to 1990. To eliminate some of the lines, click on the sector name in the color key. The table below gives details for the 2017 and 2016 levels.

Jobs in the 10 sectors on Long Island

More detailed breakdown of 2017 vs. 2016

Industry            (job levels in thousands) Sept 2017 Sept 2016 Change in year
TOTAL NONFARM 1,343.5 1,334.7 0.7%
TOTAL PRIVATE 1,151.0 1,142.5 0.7%
Total Goods Producing 148.2 152.3 -2.7%
   Construction, Natural Resources, Mining 78.0 80.3 -2.9%
         Specialty Trade Contractors 57.2 56.0 2.1%
   Manufacturing 70.2 72.0 -2.5%
      Durable Goods 38.5 40.1 -4.0%
      Non-Durable Goods 31.7 31.9 -0.6%
Total Service Providing 1,195.3 1,182.4 1.1%
Total Private Service-Providing 1,002.8 990.2 1.3%
   Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 274.6 274.8 -0.1%
      Wholesale Trade 70.3 69.8 0.7%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods 33.8 33.9 -0.3%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 27.1 26.9 0.7%
      Retail Trade 159.1 161.4 -1.4%
         Building Material and Garden Equipment 13.0 13.1 -0.8%
         Food and Beverage Stores 36.7 36.5 0.5%
            Grocery Stores 30.3 30.3 0.0%
         Health and Personal Care Stores 13.3 13.2 0.8%
         Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores 17.9 18.9 -5.3%
         General Merchandise Stores 26.7 26.1 2.3%
            Department Stores 20.1 20.1 0.0%
      Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities 45.2 43.6 3.7%
         Utilities 4.8 4.8 0.0%
         Transportation and Warehousing 40.4 38.8 4.1%
            Couriers and Messengers 5.3 5.6 -5.4%
   Information 18.7 19.2 -2.6%
         Broadcasting (except Internet) 1.0 1.0 0.0%
         Telecommunications 8.3 8.6 -3.5%
   Financial Activities 72.5 72.6 -0.1%
      Finance and Insurance 54.3 54.4 -0.2%
         Credit Intermediation and Related Activities 20.4 20.5 -0.5%
            Depository Credit Intermediation 11.6 11.6 0.0%
         Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 26.4 27.2 -2.9%
      Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 18.2 18.2 0.0%
         Real Estate 14.3 14.3 0.0%
   Professional and Business Services 179.7 178.5 0.7%
      Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 81.4 80.6 1.0%
            Legal Services 17.4 18.8 -7.4%
            Accounting, Tax Prep., Bookkpng., & Payroll Svcs. 14.2 13.6 4.4%
      Management of Companies and Enterprises 16.5 16.4 0.6%
      Admin. & Supp. and Waste Manage. & Remed. Svcs. 81.8 81.5 0.4%
   Education and Health Services 268.8 259.3 3.7%
      Educational Services 38.7 38.3 1.0%
      Health Care and Social Assistance 230.1 221.0 4.1%
         Ambulatory Health Care Services 91.3 87.3 4.6%
         Hospitals 66.5 64.0 3.9%
         Nursing and Residential Care Facilities 35.2 34.0 3.5%
         Social Assistance 37.1 35.7 3.9%
   Leisure and Hospitality 128.8 126.8 1.6%
      Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 26.1 24.5 6.5%
         Amusement, Gambling, and Recreation Industries 19.7 18.5 6.5%
      Accommodation and Food Services 102.7 102.3 0.4%
         Food Services and Drinking Places 96.5 96.5 0.0%
   Other Services 59.7 59.0 1.2%
         Personal and Laundry Services 24.0 23.5 2.1%
Government 192.5 192.2 0.2%
   Federal Government 16.2 16.5 -1.8%
   State Government 25.9 25.7 0.8%
      State Government Education 13.9 13.3 4.5%
      State Government Hospitals 1.3 1.4 -7.1%
   Local Government 150.4 150.0 0.3%
      Local Government Education 96.4 95.4 1.0%
      Local Government Hospitals 2.9 2.9 0.0%

Polar – The Online Degree Entrepreneur – amny

The Online Degree Entrepreneur

Promoted by CUNY

Promoted by CUNY

For working adults, the decision to return to school may be a personal one—some students decide to continue their education in order to advance their careers; others pursue a field of study in order to change their careers entirely. And some are following a passion in order to realize their potential.

Whatever the reason, there are now higher education institutions that offer the flexibility, convenience, and affordability that working adults require. And, one of the best ways for professionals to pursue a college level (or post-college level) education is online. You can find practically any type of academic program offered in a fully online format. With online education, no matter where you live, you have many options.

The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) provides online and on-campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

CUNY SPS recently asked their students to share the stories of their educational journey. For anyone working to create a better life for themselves and their families, Glaudy Triunfel is a great example of strengthening entrepreneurial spirit with business savvy. Here, she shares her experience of continuing her education to further her dream of owning her own business.

Meet Glaudy Triunfel

Working and Working on a Dream

As an assistant manager at Radio Shack, I know a lot about how a business runs. But working for someone else is different than working for yourself. One day, I would like to have my own business—an online woman’s clothing site. But, in order to be my own boss, I knew I needed to hone my skills and get a degree in business administration.

Making Them Proud

I decided to return to school for a Bachelor of Science in Business, although I didn’t have a lot of time or money. In addition to my own drive, another motivation for returning to school was my children. I wanted to set a good example for them and continue my education, so they can see that they can do it when it’s their turn.

A College That Respects Work/Life Balance

I chose to continue my education at CUNY SPS because of the affordability and flexibility of its programs. The classes are easy to follow and I am able to focus on the readings and assignments. While it’s hard to choose, my favorite courses are business, math, and English. 

As a student at CUNY SPS, I feel that I have acquired the knowledge I need to make it in the business industry. I now feel prepared to run my own business and be successful at it.

Make Time for Your Future

For students who are considering applying for admission—and especially those juggling work and family, I would recommend that they take my story into consideration. I was able to hold a job, attend an excellent school, and take care of my family because of the way the online programs are structured at CUNY SPS. Another piece of advice I would give to someone considering admission to my degree program, is to learn how to manage your time. Give yourself enough time to apply yourself fully to the courses. Don’t leave your assignments to the last minute; you don’t want to find yourself falling behind or over-loaded with work. 

I’ve received a lot of great advice while at CUNY SPS, but none so much as that you are never too old to achieve a degree. Giving up on your dreams should never be an option. I took that advice to heart and now I’m on my way to earning a Bachelor of Science in Business!

For more information on enrolling at CUNY SPS and read other inspiring stories from CUNY SPS students, click here.

The news and editorial staff of amNewYork had no role in the creation of this content

Home Style is Personal. Find Your Style – Newsday

Home Style is Personal. Find Your Style.

Home style is personal — whether it comes from a well-known celebrity’s penchant for makeovers, a retailer’s newest curated collections, or your own sense of design and décor. Finding the style that’s right for you is equal parts art and science. Part of the art is understanding the various furniture styles and latest design trends. Part of the science is understanding size and the scale of your rooms and planning accordingly.

Newsday’s Brand360 content studio, in cooperation with the largest, A+ rated*, and family-owned Thomasville Furniture dealer serving Long Island for the last 30 years, offers the following suggestions to help you plan a new roomscape that meets your personal style and refreshes your personal space.

*Better Business Bureau Ranking 2016

TWO BELOVED BRANDS: ONE GREAT COLLECTION

Everyone knows Ellen DeGeneres as the uber-popular and dancing talk show host, but Ellen is also an accomplished home decorator. She has bought and renovated nearly a dozen homes over the last twenty-five years, and describes her real-estate and decorating adventures as “an education”. Since her early days of home rehab and redecorating, Ellen has cared deeply about design: “I think I wanted to be an interior designer when I was thirteen,” admits DeGeneres.

One of the oldest American made home furnishing brands, Thomasville Furniture, is proud to unveil a very special collection in collaboration with Ellen DeGeneres that reflects her passion for design and architecture. The new American lifestyle brand is inspired by her iconic style, values and personality. Stylish and accessible, ED by Ellen DeGeneres offers universal appeal and reflects the warmth and eclecticism of the designer herself.

FIND YOUR STYLE, FIND YOURSELF

Thoughtfully designed, the ED Ellen DeGeneres Crafted by Thomasville furniture collection resonates with consumers looking for fresh designs to showcase their sense of style and individual design sense. With over 100 pieces, the ED Ellen DeGeneres home collection offers designs in two distinctive styles, Mid-Century Modern and Rustic Modern. Key to the collections are comfortable upholstered items for bedroom, dining room and occasional groupings.

Mid-century Modern combines all the best style elements of the middle of the 20th century: clean functional lines, gentle organic curves, and the juxtaposition of different materials. Ellen’s charm and warmth are evident in her take on Rustic Modern with nature-inspired textures, simple and earthy colors, and organic warmth combined with modern amenities. Both styles reflect the carefully curated furnishings in Ellen’s personal homes, and her true love of furniture design.

Thomasville and ED Ellen DeGeneres are a match made in a well-furnished heaven! Both Thomasville Furniture and Ellen DeGeneres are proven brands that generations of consumers have welcomed in their homes, and in their hearts.

FINISHING TOUCHES

There’s nothing quite like a beautifully pulled together room — one that is thoughtfully planned, invitingly decorated, and accessorized to reflect a unique point of view. Upholstery can play a big part in expressing a distinctive flair, whether it’s a fondness for rich fabrics in neutral tones, a passion for pattern, or ardor for color. Or maybe it’s a little bit of each. If you’re in love with a dashing stripe, but too timid to cover a whole sofa in it, why not put it on an ottoman or a pair of pillows? Want pattern but are afraid to overpower the room? Put it on a single occasional chair. It’s all in the mix. And if you want a second opinion or a helping hand, a Thomasville design consultant is available 24/7 to help you select from among dozens of sofas, chairs, sectionals, settees, ottomans and benches.

SIMPLE CHOICES

Today, you can become your own furniture designer by creating a custom look that’s just right for your style and space. Thomasville Designer Options make it easy to scale your furniture perfectly to any room. Keep in mind that any consideration of furniture sizing and placement should always include arm, pillow and back options. At Thomasville, where all of their products are “Made in America,” you can select the options you want from the thousands of combinations by using their Simple Choices™ guide, Room Planner software, or by working directly with a Thomasville Design Consultant.

First, consider the frame style and size of your sofa, loveseat, sectional, chair or ottoman. Then choose from arm and cushion options. Add on your base or leg preference. Select the type of back and trim, if needed. Once you’ve got your basic structural requirements in order, choose from over 800 customizable fabrics, and wood finishes, upholstery, and leather choices to really make your look your own.

MODERN STYLING, TIMELESS SILHOUETTES

Another signature line to consider is Thomasville’s Anthony Baratta collection that includes 50 pieces of bedroom, dining, occasional and upholstery. Best described as a mix of relaxed resort and modern cottage, with a smattering of nautical elements, all designs are shapely and detailed. Sofas range from relaxed and casual camelbacks to curved-front crescents and loose-cushion shelter frames, while chairs feature rounded backs and exaggerated wings that engage the eye from every angle. Exquisite tailoring details include decorative tapes, button-tufting and nail head trims.

Baratta’s distinctive wood products provide a bold counterpoint to the shapely upholstery designs. Bold bevels executed in solid oak and quartered oak veneers are finished in a warm taupe. White is a signature accent throughout the collection. Cerusing, a wire brushed technique to open the grain, is a defining accent on painted or leather-wrapped doors, drawers, and tops giving a signature look to many of the pieces.

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD DECORATOR

Thomasville Home Furnishings, located in Farmingdale, Mt. Sinai and Westbury, has been a proud member of the Thomasville Furniture family for the last 30 years. “We are proud to be part of an American-made company who has been committed to building quality furniture in its plant in North Carolina since 1905,” says Thomasville Home Furnishings Owner, John Campbell. “Like our parent, Thomasville Home Furnishings, has built our reputation on quality products and services”, Campbell continues, “The hard work and know-how that we put into our design showrooms, pricing, delivery and customer service have earned us a consistent A+ ranking from the Better Business Bureau, and made us Thomasville’s largest dealer for the last three decades.”

Stop by any of the Thomasville Home Furnishings showrooms in Farmingdale (900 Broad Hollow Road), Westbury (1260 Old Country Road) or Mt. Sinai (271 Rt. 25A) and take advantage of their no charge design service that includes in-store and at home consultation. At Thomasville, they will work with you to get the look you want… the way you want.

The news and editorial staff of Newsday had no role in the creation of this content

Long Island job levels in August

The total, non-farm sector job count on Long Island rose by 6,600 to more than 1.34 million in August 2017 compared to a year earlier, according to the state’s Labor Department. Leading the increases were the private educational and health services sector, which rose by 6,800, leisure and hospitality, which rose by 3,800, and the government sector, which rose by 1,000. Manufacturing lost 1,800 jobs and construction lost 1,500. Click on the trend lines below for details on the 10 sectors going back to 1990. To eliminate some of the lines, click on the sector name in the color key. The table below gives details for the 2017 and 2016 levels. And you can read more about the employment trends.

Jobs in the 10 sectors on Long Island

More detailed breakdown of 2017 vs. 2016

Industry            (job levels in thousands) Aug. 2017 Aug. 2016 Change in year
TOTAL NONFARM 1,343.3 1,336.7 0.5%
TOTAL PRIVATE 1,157.4 1,151.8 0.5%
Total Goods Producing 149.9 153.2 -2.2%
   Construction, Natural Resources, Mining 79.7 81.2 -1.8%
         Specialty Trade Contractors 58.3 56.5 3.2%
   Manufacturing 70.2 72.0 -2.5%
      Durable Goods 38.6 40.4 -4.5%
      Non-Durable Goods 31.6 31.6 0.0%
Total Service Providing 1,193.4 1,183.5 0.8%
Total Private Service-Providing 1,007.5 998.6 0.9%
   Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 273.2 273.7 -0.2%
      Wholesale Trade 71.0 70.3 1.0%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods 34.0 34.2 -0.6%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 27.1 27.1 0.0%
      Retail Trade 162.0 164.2 -1.3%
         Building Material and Garden Equipment 13.3 13.5 -1.5%
         Food and Beverage Stores 37.2 37.4 -0.5%
            Grocery Stores 30.5 30.9 -1.3%
         Health and Personal Care Stores 13.4 13.2 1.5%
         Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores 18.5 19.5 -5.1%
         General Merchandise Stores 26.7 26.5 0.8%
            Department Stores 20.1 20.3 -1.0%
      Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities 40.2 39.2 2.6%
         Utilities 4.8 4.9 -2.0%
         Transportation and Warehousing 35.4 34.3 3.2%
            Couriers and Messengers 5.2 5.5 -5.5%
   Information 18.8 19.2 -2.1%
         Broadcasting (except Internet) 1.0 1.0 0.0%
         Telecommunications 8.3 8.4 -1.2%
   Financial Activities 72.2 73.2 -1.4%
      Finance and Insurance 53.8 54.7 -1.6%
         Credit Intermediation and Related Activities 20.4 20.6 -1.0%
            Depository Credit Intermediation 11.6 11.7 -0.9%
         Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 26.5 27.3 -2.9%
      Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 18.4 18.5 -0.5%
         Real Estate 14.3 14.5 -1.4%
   Professional and Business Services 179.2 179.2 0.0%
      Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 81.4 81.6 -0.2%
            Legal Services 17.7 19.0 -6.8%
            Accounting, Tax Prep., Bookkpng., & Payroll Svcs. 14.4 13.6 5.9%
      Management of Companies and Enterprises 16.0 16.3 -1.8%
      Admin. & Supp. and Waste Manage. & Remed. Svcs. 81.8 81.3 0.6%
   Education and Health Services 263.7 256.9 2.6%
      Educational Services 37.5 38.1 -1.6%
      Health Care and Social Assistance 226.2 218.8 3.4%
         Ambulatory Health Care Services 90.7 87.0 4.3%
         Hospitals 66.0 63.3 4.3%
         Nursing and Residential Care Facilities 34.9 34.0 2.6%
         Social Assistance 34.6 34.5 0.3%
   Leisure and Hospitality 141.3 137.5 2.8%
      Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 31.9 31.7 0.6%
         Amusement, Gambling, and Recreation Industries 25.6 26.0 -1.5%
      Accommodation and Food Services 109.4 105.8 3.4%
         Food Services and Drinking Places 103.2 99.1 4.1%
   Other Services 59.1 58.9 0.3%
         Personal and Laundry Services 23.9 23.7 0.8%
Government 185.9 184.9 0.5%
   Federal Government 16.3 16.5 -1.2%
   State Government 24.4 24.1 1.2%
      State Government Education 11.9 11.4 4.4%
      State Government Hospitals 1.4 1.4 0.0%
   Local Government 145.2 144.3 0.6%
      Local Government Education 84.7 83.8 1.1%
      Local Government Hospitals 2.9 2.9 0.0%

Citi Bike expansion plans

Citi Bike plans to expand in three boroughs starting Sept. 12, according to the city’s Department of Transportation. The plans call for adding
2,000 bikes and 140 new stations in neighborhoods including Harlem, Long Island City, Astoria, Crown Heights and Prospect Heights by the end of the year. This map shows current stations in green and expansion stations in pink. Zoom in and click on any dot for details; capacities for the expansion stations haven’t been announced, so those are listed as “0” for now. Read more about the Citi Bike expansion. This map was posted on Sept. 8, 2017.

Citi Bike stations

  • Existing
  • Planned

Long Island job levels in July

The total, non-farm sector job count on Long Island rose by 16,700 to nearly 1.36 million in July 2017 compared to a year earlier, according to the state’s Labor Department. Leading the increases were the private educational and health services sector, which rose by 9,200, leisure and hospitality, which rose by 3,000, and
the construction industry, which gained 2,800 jobs, more than four times the average gain. Click on the trend lines below for details on the 10 sectors going back to 1990. To eliminate some of the lines, click on the sector name in the color key. The table below gives details for the 2017 and 2016 levels. And you can read more about the latest jobs numbers.

Jobs in the 10 sectors on Long Island

More detailed breakdown of 2017 vs. 2016

Industry            (job levels in thousands) July 2017 July 2016 Change in year
TOTAL NON-FARM 1,359.9 1,343.2 1.2%
TOTAL PRIVATE 1,169.6 1,154.7 1.3%
Total Goods Producing 152.0 152.7 -0.5%
   Construction, Natural Resources, Mining 82.0 80.9 1.4%
         Specialty Trade Contractors 59.5 56.4 5.5%
   Manufacturing 70.0 71.8 -2.5%
      Durable Goods 38.5 40.4 -4.7%
      Non-Durable Goods 31.5 31.4 0.3%
Total Service Providing 1,207.9 1,190.5 1.5%
Total Private Service-Providing 1,017.6 1,002.0 1.6%
   Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 274.5 274.0 0.2%
      Wholesale Trade 71.5 70.4 1.6%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods 34.3 34.3 0.0%
         Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 27.1 27.1 0.0%
      Retail Trade 162.8 164.5 -1.0%
         Building Material and Garden Equipment 13.6 13.8 -1.4%
         Food and Beverage Stores 37.4 37.3 0.3%
            Grocery Stores 30.7 30.9 -0.6%
         Health and Personal Care Stores 13.5 13.2 2.3%
         Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores 19.0 19.5 -2.6%
         General Merchandise Stores 26.5 26.4 0.4%
            Department Stores 19.9 20.2 -1.5%
      Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities 40.2 39.1 2.8%
         Utilities 4.8 4.8 0.0%
         Transportation and Warehousing 35.4 34.3 3.2%
            Couriers and Messengers 5.1 5.4 -5.6%
   Information 19.4 19.6 -1.0%
         Broadcasting (except Internet) 1.1 1.0 10.0%
         Telecommunications 8.3 8.7 -4.6%
   Financial Activities 73.0 73.3 -0.4%
      Finance and Insurance 54.6 54.8 -0.4%
         Credit Intermediation and Related Activities 20.4 20.6 -1.0%
            Depository Credit Intermediation 11.6 11.7 -0.9%
         Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 26.7 27.4 -2.6%
      Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 18.4 18.5 -0.5%
         Real Estate 14.5 14.4 0.7%
   Professional and Business Services 182.0 179.5 1.4%
      Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 82.8 81.9 1.1%
            Legal Services 18.0 19.1 -5.8%
            Accounting, Tax Prep., Bookkpng., & Payroll Svcs. 14.5 13.6 6.6%
      Management of Companies and Enterprises 16.5 16.4 0.6%
      Admin. & Supp. and Waste Manage. & Remed. Svcs. 82.7 81.2 1.8%
   Education and Health Services 266.3 257.1 3.6%
      Educational Services 37.3 37.5 -0.5%
      Health Care and Social Assistance 229.0 219.6 4.3%
         Ambulatory Health Care Services 91.6 87.4 4.8%
         Hospitals 65.7 63.1 4.1%
         Nursing and Residential Care Facilities 34.9 34.0 2.6%
         Social Assistance 36.8 35.1 4.8%
   Leisure and Hospitality 142.4 139.4 2.2%
      Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 33.4 32.9 1.5%
         Amusement, Gambling, and Recreation Industries 26.2 26.0 0.8%
      Accommodation and Food Services 109.0 106.5 2.3%
         Food Services and Drinking Places 103.0 99.5 3.5%
   Other Services 60.0 59.1 1.5%
         Personal and Laundry Services 24.1 23.8 1.3%
Government 190.3 188.5 1.0%
   Federal Government 16.5 16.5 0.0%
   State Government 24.4 24.1 1.2%
      State Government Education 11.9 11.3 5.3%
      State Government Hospitals 1.4 1.4 0.0%
   Local Government 149.4 147.9 1.0%
      Local Government Education 88.7 87.3 1.6%
      Local Government Hospitals 2.9 2.8 3.6%

New York leads in rate of Zika infections

New York State has the highest rate of Zika infections in the nation, with 883 cases or 11.23 for every 250,000 residents, according to figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Florida ranks second, with 10.83 cases for every 250,000 residents. The two states also rank first and second in total number of cases. In Florida. there were 139 locally acquired cases, which no other state is reporting. You can read about local companies in the Zika fight. This data in the map and table below represent the count as of Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016.

Zika rates by state, from Centers for Disease Control

Hover over any state to see the number of cases per 100,000 residents.

0 to 11 to 22-44-99+

States Total cases Rate per 250,000 residents Travel-related cases Travel cases as % of nation Locally acquired cased
Alabama 28 1.45 28 1 0
Alaska 0 0.00 0 0 0
Arizona 42 1.58 42 1 0
Arkansas 13 1.10 13 <1 0
California 312 2.03 312 8 0
Colorado 46 2.18 46 1 0
Connecticut 58 4.03 58 1 0
Delaware 16 4.32 16 <1 0
District of Columbia 25 9.67 25 1 0
Florida* 847 10.83 708 18 139
Georgia 96 2.40 96 2 0
Hawaii 14 2.49 14 <1 0
Idaho 4 0.62 4 <1 0
Illinois 76 1.47 76 2 0
Indiana 45 1.71 45 1 0
Iowa 17 1.38 17 <1 0
Kansas 17 1.47 17 <1 0
Kentucky 24 1.37 24 1 0
Louisiana 34 1.84 34 1 0
Maine 11 2.07 11 <1 0
Maryland 107 4.51 107 3 0
Massachusetts 97 3.62 97 2 0
Michigan 62 1.57 62 2 0
Minnesota 53 2.44 53 1 0
Mississippi 23 1.92 23 1 0
Missouri 34 1.41 34 1 0
Montana 7 1.72 7 <1 0
Nebraska 12 1.61 12 <1 0
Nevada 15 1.34 15 <1 0
New Hampshire 11 2.08 11 <1 0
New Jersey 134 3.76 134 3 0
New Mexico 9 1.08 9 <1 0
New York 883 11.23 883 22 0
North Carolina 73 1.85 73 2 0
North Dakota 2 0.69 2 <1 0
Ohio 69 1.49 69 2 0
Oklahoma 29 1.88 29 1 0
Oregon 33 2.10 33 1 0
Pennsylvania** 147 2.88 147 4 0
Rhode Island 33 7.85 33 1 0
South Carolina 53 2.77 53 1 0
South Dakota 2 0.59 2 <1 0
Tennessee 54 2.08 54 1 0
Texas 237 2.24 237 6 0
Utah*** 15 1.29 15 <1 0
Vermont 10 3.99 10 <1 0
Virginia 90 2.72 90 2 0
Washington 53 1.90 53 1 0
West Virginia 11 1.48 11 <1 0
Wisconsin 43 1.87 43 1 0
Wyoming 2 0.86 2 <1 0

* Includes 139 locally acquired cases. **One additional case acquired through laboratory transmission. ***Includes one case with unknown route of person-to-person transmission.

Florida outpaces New York on consumer fraud complaints

Floridians filed fraud and identity theft complaints nearly three times more often than New Yorkers did last year, according to a new federal report.

New York consumers made 524 complaints for every 100,000 residents. Florida had the highest rate of fraud complaints in the United States with 1,510 for every 100,000 residents. Nationwide, there were to 3 million complaints filed last year, the Federal Trade Commission’s report indicated.

The FTC puts out an annual analysis using millions of consumer complaints collected by more than 50 law enforcement agencies and private companies. The reports are voluntary and not verified by the FTC. The median amount of fraud reported was $400.

How the states compare on fraud complaint rates

Federal Trade Commission 2015 fraud complaints per 100,000 population

Hover over any state to see the number of complaints per 100,000 people.

275 to 430431 to 525526 to 630631 to 800801 to 1,511

Complaints were up 3 percent in New York, 49 percent in Florida and 17 percent nationally compared to 2014. The FTC says the increase in complaints came largely from an Android-based app, PrivacyStar, that lets users block suspected scammers and report details to the FTC.

Three out of four people who filed complaints said they were contacted by alleged scammers by phone last year. Only 8 percent of reported fraud was committed via email, complainants said, down from 23 percent during 2014.

According to the complaints, criminals scammed money and personal information most frequently by citing claims of outstanding debt or by posing as government agents. Altogether, identity theft, debt collection and imposter scams made up half of filed complaints. Stolen identities were most often used to sign up for government documents or benefits, followed by credit cards.

The reports are filed by individuals, but corporations have been targets of data breach and identity thefts. Last year on Long Island, North Shore Hospital, now known as Northwell Health, joined the list of data breach victims such as Target, Home Depot, JPMorgan Chase and government agencies such as the State Department, raising concerns over cyber security among business owners.

How the states rank on fraud complaints

Hover over bars to see the number of complaints per 100,000 population

Nearly two-thirds of those filing complaints said they paid alleged scammers using wire transfer last year, while only 29 percent of victims said they so the year before.

The FTC recommends several protocols for consumers to follow to avoid being defrauded. In case of any lawful debt collection, for example, a written validation notice must be issued by your creditor for the amount you owe, and the debt collectors must be able to give you their physical address and business phone number.

Fraud complaints by state

The rate and number of complaints filed in 2015, along with state rank

State Fraud complaint rate Fraud complaints Rank
Florida 1,510.2 306,133 1
Georgia 1,208.3 123,429 2
Michigan 1,143.6 113,474 3
Texas 941.3 258,579 4
Nevada 836.9 24,194 5
Delaware 807.8 7,641 6
Rhode Island 764.7 8,078 7
California 750.2 293,662 8
Maryland 749.0 44,985 9
Alabama 738.1 35,865 10
Tennessee 670.3 44,241 11
Louisiana 663.7 30,999 12
Virginia 645.3 54,093 13
New Jersey 626.5 56,121 14
Pennsylvania 626.3 80,180 15
Arizona 623.5 42,575 16
Missouri 609.3 37,068 17
Ohio 606.8 70,470 18
New Mexico 594.1 12,387 19
Colorado 592.6 32,333 20
New Hampshire 572.0 7,611 21
Massachusetts 557.6 37,884 22
Connecticut 554.1 19,898 23
South Carolina 553.3 27,091 24
North Carolina 550.3 55,266 25
New York 524.9 103,918 26
Illinois 517.2 66,510 27
Mississippi 516.3 15,450 28
Indiana 511.1 33,836 29
Oregon 506.0 20,387 30
Washington 505.7 36,264 31
Oklahoma 493.6 19,307 32
Arkansas 478.4 14,248 33
Kentucky 467.2 20,674 34
Maine 447.1 5,943 35
West Virginia 446.8 8,240 36
Montana 442.6 4,572 37
Wisconsin 442.6 25,544 37
Minnesota 438.2 24,055 39
Kansas 426.9 12,430 40
Idaho 423.1 7,002 41
Wyoming 415.5 2,435 42
Vermont 406.7 2,546 43
Nebraska 403.3 7,648 44
Utah 396.2 11,870 45
Alaska 395.0 2,917 46
Hawaii 371.3 5,315 47
South Dakota 356.0 3,056 48
Iowa 349.2 10,909 49
North Dakota 278.8 2,110 50