Newsday’s All-Long Island teams 2015-16

Watch the videos below as Newsday reveals its All-Long Island teams for sports in the Spring 2016 high school season.

Coaches will be contacted tonight regarding photo shoots for the teams as part of our All-Long Island special section in a later edition of Newsday. The photo shoots are scheduled for the afternoons of Wednesday, June 15 and Thursday, June 16.

Winter 2015-16 teams

Newsday’s All-Long Island teams for nine sports in the Winter 2015-16 season.

Fall 2015 sports

Newsday’s All-Long Island teams for nine sports in the Fall 2015 high school season.

Personal bankruptcy down on Long Island and up nationally

Personal bankruptcy filings on Long Island have declined sharply this year, even as filings in the United States rose 10 percent, the first national increase since 2010.

From January through November, Long Islanders filed an average of 411 bankruptcy cases a month this year according to filings with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of New York. That rate was 14.1 percent lower than the same period last year and almost half the pace of 2010, when 817 cases per month were filed through November.

The decline in Long Island filings for the fifth straight year in a row signals that finances for people here have improved, experts said.

Long Island and regional personal bankruptcy filings

The figure is a monthly average, based on number of filings from January through November each year in federal district court.

Bankruptcy “is always the last and worst option,” said James Chessen, chief economist at American Bankers Association. “Bottom line, consumers are doing a better job managing debt.”

The unemployment rate for Long Island dropped to 4.1 percent for October, the lowest figure for that month since 2007 according to the state Labor Department.

Other Long Island indicators also point to people faring better.

Only 12 percent of the Island’s consumers were 90 or more days late on any loan in the second quarter, compared with 14.8 percent in the state, and 20 percent nationwide, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

“Long Island’s unemployment rate is relatively low. The workforce is relatively more educated,” said John A. Rizzo, chief economist with the Long Island Association, a regional business group. “This leads to a more favorable profile of the bankruptcy filing.”

Experts said the national rise in bankruptcy filings follows higher spending and higher debt taken on by consumers.

Percentage change in personal bankruptcy filings for the U.S. and Long Island

The Long Island average is through a 11-month period, whereas the U.S. average is based on yearly figure.

In the United States and on Long Island, bankruptcy filings have mostly declined since 2005, in part because Congress raised the income threshold to file for bankruptcy, and because it increased the filing cost by about 30 percent to $2,500 on average.

U.S. personal bankruptcy filings

Starting this month, federal bankruptcy application forms will change. The changes include more forms to fill out, seeking to reduce omissions, and may require more work by consumers and attorneys, increasing filing costs.

The goal is for information “to be recorded more accurately,” said Andrew Doktofsky, a Long Island bankruptcy attorney. “The forms are definitely more detail-oriented.”

What are you talking about this Thanksgiving?

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What are you talking about this Thanksgiving?

Thanksgiving dinner is an occasion for conversations big and small. This year, many people will talk about the state of the world and nation, from refugees and deadly terrorism to football and Adele’s new album. What subjects will you talk about with family and friends at this year’s dinner table? We invite you to share your conversation on our website, and to read comments from fellow readers. Submissions will be edited.?

Click on the boxes to below to read the full responses from other readers.

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Thanksgiving on Long Island: Day in the Life in photos

Maybe your Thanksgiving table is set for 24 or maybe you’re celebrating with a few close loved ones. Or maybe you watch a great movie, order a nice pizza and just give thanks for the ease of the day.

However you spend it, we want to see what Thanksgiving looks like for you.

Show us your traditions, your table, your grandma’s famous pecan pie. Tag your Instagrams with #DayintheLifeLI to be included in this collection showing how Long Islanders are spending the holiday. We’ll update them here in real time throughout the day.

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2013 Southold Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013SOUTHOLDPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.

2013 Southampton Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013SOUTHAMPTONPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.

2013 Smithtown Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013SMITHTOWNPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.

2013 Shelter Island Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013SHELTER ISLANDPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.

2013 Riverhead Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013RIVERHEADPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.

2013 Oyster Bay Payroll

2011 |
2012 |
2013 |
2014

2013OYSTER BAYPAYROLLS

ABOUT

About

The 15 towns and cities on Long Island employ more than 20,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal workers. Here are their records for employees paid in 2013.
Some towns could not provide a base pay for hourly workers. In some of those cases, an hourly pay rate is listed instead. The difference between base pay and total pay can be accounted for by many factors besides overtime, including shift differential, or payouts for unused vacation or sick time. Retiring workers may have received substantial payouts. Not all municipalities reported retirement or termination dates for all employees.

In some cases, a worker’s total pay may be less than the base pay because the worker did not work the whole year, taking an unpaid leave, for example. Some municipalities had names repeated. Unless the worker had the same title in the same department, those repetitions are listed here.

Payroll information was gathered under the state’s Freedom of Information Law by reporters Aisha Al-Muslim, Carl MacGowan, Lauren Harrison, Mackenzie Issler, Mitch Freedman, Nicholas Spangler, Patrick Whittle, Sarah Armaghan, Scott Eidler, Ted Phillips, with additional assistance from Caitlin Rondino and Lauren DelValle.

Click through the charts below for a town-to-town comparison. You can also select the full list for any municipality, and you can re-sort any list by clicking on column headings.