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Voters GuideGeneral Election, November 6, 2018

Thomas P. DiNapoli | General Election, November 6, 2018

Thomas P. DiNapoli is running for New York State comptroller

Thomas P. DiNapoli

Thomas P. DiNapoli

Democratic

BACKGROUND: DiNapoli, 64, is seeking a third full term as comptroller running on the Democratic, Independence, Working Families, Reform and Women’s Equality party lines. DiNapoli was born in Rockville Centre, raised in Albertson and currently lives in the Village of Great Neck Plaza. He obtained a bachelor’s degree from Hofstra University and a master’s degree from The New School’s Graduate School of Management and Urban Professions. DiNapoli was appointed state comptroller in 2007 by the State Legislature to fill the unexpired term of Alan Hevesi, who was forced from office in a scandal. He was elected to a full term in 2010 and re-elected in 2014. He began his government career early, becoming the first 18-year-old to be elected to office in the state when he won a seat as trustee on the Mineola Board of Education. He served 10 years, including two terms as board president. In 1986 he was elected to the State Assembly in the 16th District in northwestern Nassau County and served 10 terms. DiNapoli is single.

ISSUES: DiNapoli said he would continue to utilize the power of the state's $206.9 billion pension plan to force greater civic and corporate responsibility from businesses invested in the funds, including oil and gas companies, while also protecting the fund's investment. DiNapoli said he would continue to enact audits every five years of all school districts and BOCES statewide. Increased oversight, he said, is also planned for the MTA, Medicaid program, local municipal governments and of state economic development contracts. "We need to make sure that there is accountability in this area," DiNapoli said. In the wake of several high-profile state contracting scandals and arrests, the comptroller is also looking to restore oversight of SUNY and CUNY construction contracts and centralized contracts from the Office of General Services. In 2011 and 2012, the state legislature stripped the comptroller's office of oversight of those contracts. "I am going to use the power of this office to fight for procurement reform," DiNapoli said. "The public is demanding more transparency and accountability."