Summer after Sandy

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Heading into Long Island’s first summer after superstorm Sandy, many Long Islanders were still dealing with the storm’s destruction on a daily basis, and worrying about how they would fare during the island’s busiest season. From homes to businesses, beaches and roads, this series shows some of the dramatic images from the aftermath of the storm and the same locations six months later. Photos on the left show the damage after the storm; photos on the right show those areas now. Move the slider — the vertical divider between each set of photos — left or right for the full photo. Mobile users can tap anywhere on a photo to move the slider.

Use the navigation tools at the top of the page to see then and now photos from one and two years after Sandy.

Oak Island

before

after

Photo credit: News12 Long Island (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

South Bay flooded Oak Island homes during superstorm Sandy. Those not completely destroyed are in the midst of repairs.

Long Beach: West End

before

after

Photo credit: Doug Kuntz (Nov. 2, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

Only about half of the residents in the West End section of Long Beach have returned to their homes since Sandy wiped out the area’s one-level bungalows and the first floors of many two- and three-story homes.

Jones Beach boardwalk

before

after

Photo credit: News12 Long Island (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

Of all of Long Island’s state parks, Jones Beach required the most repairs, with park employees, state agencies and 17 contractors beginning the work within days of the storm.

Freeport’s Nautical Mile

before

after

Photo credits: J. Conrad Williams Jr. (Nov. 1, 2012); Newsday / Danielle Finkelstein (May 14, 2013)

When superstorm Sandy pummeled the Nautical Mile in Freeport, Tropix bar and restaurant was devastated by the storm surge, high winds and a raging fire.

East Massapequa

before

after

Photo credits: Johnny Milano (Nov. 9, 2012); Tara Conry (May 20, 2013)

Many of the East Massapequa homes that sit directly on the Great South Bay are vacant. Storm surges during superstorm Sandy ripped apart walls, shattered windows and washed away parts of the houses.

Smith Point Beach

before

after

Photo credit: Joseph D. Sullivan (Nov. 16, 2012); Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara (May 9, 2013)

A sense of rejuvenation is washing over visitors after the boardwalk was recently repaired and debris has been cleared. The beach, too, seems to be making a natural comeback.

Lindenhurst: Shore Road

before

after

Photo credit: James Carbone (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 9, 2013)

When the more than 4 feet of water that flooded Shore Road in Lindenhurst receded, the damage left behind was both material and emotional.

Montauk

before

after

Photo credit: Gordon M. Grant (Nov. 19, 2012 and May 9, 2013)

The oceanfront beaches in Montauk lost nearly 75 yards of sand to erosion after superstorm Sandy, leaving shores nearly 2 feet lower than they were before and oceanfront homes and hotels with their foundations exposed.

Ocean Parkway

before

after

Photo credit: Steve Pfost (Nov. 16, 2012 and May 12, 2013)

Ocean Parkway suffered such severe Sandy damage that New York State awarded a $33.2-million contract to three New York-based companies to repair it just a month-and-a-half after the storm hit.

Long Beach boardwalk

before

after

Photo credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara (Nov. 18, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

Long Beach was one of the areas hit hardest by superstorm Sandy, and the most iconic part of the city to fall prey was the boardwalk.

Nikon at Jones Beach Theater

before

after

Photo credit: News12 Long Island (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

More than 4 feet of water flooded the Nikon at Jones Beach Theater, damaging its VIP boardwalk, box office, electrical system, orchestra seating and concession supplies.

Center Moriches: Ocean Avenue

before

after

Photo credit: John Roca (Oct. 27, 2012 and May 11, 2013)

Water from Moriches Bay flooded the southernmost part of Ocean Avenue in Center Moriches, bringing 4 feet of water into the streets and many of the homes.

Fire Island

before

after

Photo credit: Ed Betz (Feb. 7, 2013 and May 10, 2013)

Fire Island’s recovery from Sandy has been equal parts resolve and rumination — how to rebuild while coming to terms with man’s limits vs. Mother Nature. But while the discussion goes on, locals are preparing for summer as usual.

Mastic Beach

before

after

Photo credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 9, 2013)

The Village of Mastic Beach saw widespread flooding, downed trees, outages and homes damaged. While much has been cleared, some residents are still struggling to make repairs, while others have left altogether.

Westhampton Beach

before

after

Photo credit: Doug Kuntz (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 14, 2013)

Many of the ground-level homes in Westhampton Beach were flooded by storm surges from Moriches Bay. As summer nears, signs of hope and normality are returning.

Freeport neighborhoods

before

after

Photo credit: Howard Schnapp (Oct. 30, 2012 and May 13, 2013)

Most Freeport residents are back in their homes, but many are still repairing the damage from a 9-foot storm surge that crested over nearby Woodcleft Canal.

Lindenhurst: South Wellwood Avenue

before

after

Photo credit: James Carbone (Oct. 29, 2012 and May 9, 2013)

Residents living on South Wellwood Avenue in Lindenhurst are still trying to restore their homes, which took in roughly 4 feet of water laced with silt, fuel and debris from the Great South Bay.

Center Moriches: Inletview Place

before

after

Photo credit: John Roca (Oct. 30, 2012 an May 11, 2013)

Water from Moriches Bay swept over the small spit of land between Ocean Avenue in Center Moriches and Inletview Place, breaking down boat docks and house walls, and flushing out homes.