Billy Joel

at Nassau Coliseum

Relive his 32 Coliseum shows, from
1977 to 2015
Photo credit: Sony Music Entertainment / Art Maillet
Dec. 11, 1977 (1 show) The Stranger
Photo credit: Sony Music Entertainment / Art Maillet

Dec. 11, 1977 (1 show)

The Stranger

Billy Joel remembers feeling on the night of Dec. 11, 1977, that it was a case of “Hometown Boy Makes Good.”

“That was a big charge,” Joel said in a June 2015 interview. “All of a sudden, here I am playing in arenas after years of slogging away in the trenches. Now, I’m home and I’m playing the big room, so of course that was a thrill.”

WNEW-FM’s Pete Fornatale put the night in perspective, telling the capacity crowd, “This is a homecoming for all of us as much as it is for Billy.”

Long Island got the chance to celebrate its own homegrown rock star in its own arena. It was an event to remember. And Joel did his best to make it special, even changing up his show. “Now you don’t have to sit around waiting for that song,” Joel said, after he played “Piano Man” early in the set.

Set list

By the numbers

  • Attendance 18,000
  • Copies sold of “The Stranger” 10 million
  • Grammys won for “Just the Way You Are” 2

Billy Joel remembers

We’d worked in the New York-Long Island area for so long that we thought [Nassau Coliseum] was the right place for us to start doing arenas … I also chalked it up to local following. I thought, ‘this hasn’t translated nationally.’ I hadn’t realized at the time that it actually had.

It took me awhile to catch up with what was going on. The album [‘The Stranger’] had gotten so big, but you don’t know when you’re out on the road just playing. The rooms get bigger, you think, ‘Well, OK, more people heard about us.’

Review

On “Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song),” he sounded very much like Paul McCartney would sound if McCartney had grown up in Hicksville. Joel, however, brought to mind other artists last night. “New York State of Mind” is such a perfect counterpart to “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” that it’s a wonder Tony Bennett hasn’t recorded it. Joel sang the song with a growly inflection that made it clear that this would also be a fine vehicle for Ray Charles. Joel added a few words to the lyrics for this occasion. On the original recording, Joel notes missing “The New York Times, the Daily News.” Last night, Joel added “Newsday, too” to that line and the audience actually cheered. — Wayne Robins, Newsday, Dec. 12, 1977

‘Just the Way You Are’

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SET LIST

The Stranger

Somewhere Along the Line

Summer, Highland Falls

Piano Man

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

Travelin’ Prayer

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Still Crazy After All These Years

Just the Way You Are

Prelude

Angry Young Man

New York State of Mind

The Entertainer

Vienna

Root Beer Rag

She’s Always a Woman

I’ve Loved These Days

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

The Ballad of Billy the Kid

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas

Captain Jack

Say Goodbye to Hollywood

Only the Good Die Young

ENCORES:

Get It Right the First Time

Souvenir

May 28, 1979 (1 show) Charity Begins at Home
Photo credit: Kevin Mazur

May 28, 1979 (1 show)

Charity Begins at Home

This was very much, ‘I owe you. I’m very grateful that you’ve supported me and you’re coming to see me at these big arenas.’ — Billy Joel

Billy Joel had been looking for a way to give back to Long Island and received a letter from the Rehabilitation Institute in Mineola suggesting a concert. He thought it was a good idea and established the Charity Begins at Home charitable organization to handle the proceeds.

“This was very much, ‘I owe you. I’m very grateful that you’ve supported me and you’re coming to see me at these big arenas,’ ” Joel said, in June 2015, of the show.

The sold-out show, which became the first in a long series of fundraising concerts, generated money and publicity for local nonprofit groups, ranging from vocational training centers to those serving underprivileged children.

By the numbers

  • Charities helped by the concert 8
  • Record stores that participated in supporting the show 25
  • Money raised for various charities by the sold-out concert $300,000
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July 24-25, 1980 (2 shows) Glass Houses
Photo credit: Kevin Mazur

July 24-25, 1980 (2 shows)

Glass Houses

Billy Joel had sold out five shows at Madison Square Garden the month before, but he wanted to give Long Islanders a taste of the “Glass Houses” tour on their home turf. He turned two shows at the Coliseum into benefits for Charity Begins at Home — which his then-wife Elizabeth had just started to run full-time as she stepped away from managing Joel’s career — and sold those shows out as well. It was a heady time. “Glass Houses” was in its sixth week at No. 1 on the albums chart and “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me” had just started its two-week run atop the singles charts.

By the numbers

  • Prime ticket cost $25
  • Total number of tickets sold for both shows 32,000
  • Amount distributed to various LI charities $600,000
Set list

He did ‘The Stranger,’ ‘Honesty,’ ‘I Love You Just the Way You Are.’ That was really unbelievable to be sitting there listening to him play. — Adrian Kaplan Rosen, Syosset

‘It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me’ is the song by which many will remember the summer of 1980. — Wayne Robins, Newsday, June 25, 1980

‘It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me’

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SET LIST

(July 24, 1980)

You May Be Right

Only the Good Die Young

My Life

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Piano Man

Summer, Highland Falls

Zanzibar

She’s Got a Way

Stiletto

The Stranger

Don’t Ask Me Why

New York State of Mind

Prelude/Angry Young Man

Sleeping With the Television On

She’s Always a Woman

Just the Way You Are

Sometimes a Fantasy

Big Shot

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

ENCORES:

All for Leyna

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

Souvenir

Dec. 29, 1982 (1 show) The Nylon Curtain
Photo credit: Kevin Mazur

Dec. 29, 1982 (1 show)

The Nylon Curtain

The concert was being filmed for Joel’s first concert special, “Live from Long Island,” which aired on HBO in 1983. That meant the house lights were up for nearly the entire concert, cameras were zooming around and the audience was filled with VIPs.

“Everyone I ever knew in my whole life is here,” joked Joel.

He also introduced a lot of new material from his album “The Nylon Curtain,” which arrived only a few months earlier, creating an unusual flow to the Coliseum concert.

Set list

By the numbers

  • Peak position of “The Nylon Curtain” on the album charts 7
  • Length of concert that aired on HBO, in minutes 80
  • Actual length of concert, in minutes 150
  • Copies of “The Nylon Curtain” sold 2 million
  • Band members who toast the crowd with a bottle of white and a bottle of red during “Scenes from an Italian Restaurant” 4

Review

Wednesday’s performance was peculiar. The mood of the nearly two-and-a-half-hour show was dictated not by the band and not by the audience, but by the camera lights that never went dim. … The benign aura of mutual self-congratulation between Joel and his hometown audience soon became one of self-consciousness. … The older songs were received with more enthusiasm. The band performed with quiet confidence, yet sounded completely more restrained than it is capable of being. — Wayne Robins, Newsday, Dec. 31, 1982

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SET LIST

Allentown

My Life

Prelude/Angry Young Man

Piano Man

The Stranger

Scandinavian Skies

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Pressure

Until the Night

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

Just the Way You Are

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

Sometimes a Fantasy

Big Shot

You May Be Right

ENCORES:

Only the Good Die Young

Souvenir

Dec. 21 & 31, 1989 (2 shows) Storm Front
Photo credit: Newsday / John Keating

Dec. 21 & 31, 1989 (2 shows)

Storm Front

Inspired by a visit with Sean Lennon, who worried about the state of the world in 1989, Joel wrote “We Didn’t Start the Fire” to chronicle what he had seen and survived in his lifetime. He may not have started “the fire,” but one had certainly been lit in him in terms of social causes. In addition to “Fire,” Joel focused on the plight of Long Island’s baymen in “The Downeaster ‘Alexa'” both on the “Storm Front” album and in his concerts.

By the numbers

  • Cost of a ticket $22.50
  • Amount brokers were charging for prime seats $500
  • Copies of “Storm Front” sold 4 million
  • Tickets confiscated from scalpers by police and donated to Little Flower Children’s Services 28
‘We Didn’t Start the Fire’

billyjoelVEVO via Youtube.com

Review

In Joel’s guileless good humor, the sentimentality of his records — toward the Long Island fishermen, toward a stylized myth of tight-trousered adolescence, or that New York state of mind — came off as genuine affection. Even the deliberate mush-headedness of “Still Rock ‘n Roll to Me” and “You May Be Right” became direct and inspiring.

There is a line somewhere between self-indulgence and just playing around, and Joel, even at his hammiest, kept to the right side of it. … He emanated corniness like gamma rays. He boxed with his microphone stand, held himself as if nailed to the cross, and even assumed the sprinter’s starting position atop his black baby grand. And for some unfathomable reason, he used smoke machines almost continuously throughout the show. But in his hometown, it all played as good-natured hucksterism; we were always in on the fun. Joel was Buster Poindexter without the hip distancing.

And that was, for all the surprisingly good music, the most striking thing about the evening. It was rare to see a star of his stature be so unguarded onstage. What I missed most in the Rolling Stones — some sense of self, a rapport with the audience — Joel delivered in spades. — John Leland, Newsday, Dec. 23, 1989

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SET LIST

(Dec. 21, 1989)

Storm Front

Allentown

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

Prelude/Angry Young Man

New York State of Mind

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

The Downeaster Alexa

Goodnight Saigon

I Go to Extremes

Pressure

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas

Leningrad

An Innocent Man

Big Man on Mulberry Street

Shameless

We Didn’t Start the Fire

Uptown Girl

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

You May Be Right

Only the Good Die Young

A Matter of Trust

Big Shot

Keeping the Faith

Piano Man

December 1993-March 1994 (7 shows) River of Dreams
Photo credit: Newsday / John Keating

December 1993-March 1994 (7 shows)

River of Dreams

Though it was an impressive tour for an album that debuted at No. 1, the “River of Dreams” run at Nassau Coliseum — Dec. 29 and 31, 1993; Jan. 2, 4, 6, 8 and March 6, 1994 — was bittersweet.

For opening night, Joel missed daughter Alexa’s eighth birthday party, though he did lead the crowd in a round of “Happy Birthday” that he played for her when he got home. He also dedicated “We Didn’t Start the Fire” to his friend, bassist Howie Blauvelt, who died earlier in the year. At the New Year’s Eve show, Joel fell off the piano and hit his head, forcing him to head to the Garden City Hotel after the show rather than making the long drive out to his then-home in East Hampton.

By the numbers

  • Weeks “River of Dreams” spent at No. 1 on the albums chart 3
  • Number of minutes in the concert 150
  • Attendance for each show 17,847
  • Copies of “River of Dreams” sold 5 million
Set list
‘All About Soul’

billyjoelVEVO via Youtube.com

Review

Leave the headsets and production numbers to Janet Jackson and Madonna. These days, in his current state of grace, Billy Joel could probably perform with just a piano and no one would be disappointed — certainly not the devoted crowd that braved the snow to pack Nassau Coliseum Wednesday.

Where other big-league performers strive to create showy illusion loaded with unattainable glamour, Billy Joel still pounds ’em out here on Earth, adding only the self-deprecating flash that acknowledges itself. When he does Elvis Presley arm-and-leg gestures or attempts Joe Tex tricks with the mike stand, Joel isn’t trying to be anything but a humble fan enjoying the reference. And though sincerity, spontaneity and awareness of an audience as people rather than demographic dollar signs are not universal values among arena performers, Billy Joel remains a flesh-and-blood guy who can actually share what’s on his mind with his fans between — and during — songs.

Beginning a long homestand with a show that he announced was being recorded, Joel was the homecoming king, an avuncular hero returning from his travels, a fond nostalgist bringing old songs to old friends. — Ira Robbins, Newsday, Dec. 31, 1993

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SET LIST

(Dec. 29, 1993)

No Man’s Land

Pressure

New York State of Mind

River of Dreams

Prelude/Angry Young Man

The Ballad of Billy the Kid

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

My Life

Vienna

I Go to Extremes

An Innocent Man

The Downeaster Alexa

Goodnight Saigon

We Didn’t Start the Fire

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

You May Be Right

Only the Good Die Young

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

Keeping the Faith

Piano Man

January-May 1998 (9 shows) Greatest Hits: Vol. III
Photo credit: Newsday / J. Michael Dombroski

January-May 1998 (9 shows)

Greatest Hits: Vol. III

“That was kind of a victory lap,” Joel says of his “Greatest Hits: Vol. III” tour ending at the Coliseum in 1998 with a record-setting nine-show run (Jan. 29; Feb. 2, 9, 11, 14, 16; April 30; and May 1, 4, 1998). It had been five years since he had decided to stop recording popular music, following the “River of Dreams” album in 1993. His popularity, though, was still growing through touring and the release of three greatest-hits collections. Joel’s greatest-hits albums, with 23 million copies sold, are the third-biggest-selling albums in history, behind only Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and The Eagles’ “Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975.”

“There was all this talk of ‘Where are we going to do this?’ ” says Joel, whose name hung in the rafters of the Coliseum following the record-setting run, alongside banners celebrating the Stanley Cup-winning Islanders teams. “We’re doing it at home. The momentum was there. The demand was there. I thought, ‘Really? They want us to play that many times? We can sell that many tickets? OK.’ It felt good.”

The final show of that tour — on May 4, 1998 — was the last time Joel played the Coliseum by himself.

By the numbers

  • Musicians with a banner in Nassau Coliseum before Joel on this tour 0
  • Height of Joel’s banner, in feet 15
  • Ticket price $37.50
  • Total gross for “Greatest Hits: Vol. III” tour $47 million
  • People who saw the tour 1.1 million
Set list

Sony Music

Review

There was no doubt that he reveled in being on his native Long Island, where he was kicking off a string of homecoming shows as part of a Northeast tour. He cracked enough jokes about his early years here to give the show the air of a high school reunion, bantering about skipping school to hang out at Jones Beach — “under the tunnel at Parking Field Four” — and cruising Hempstead Turnpike in a futile quest for women. At one point, he grabbed the hand of a man in the front row and exclaimed: “I grew up across the street from this [expletive] guy!”

The sold-out crowd, which included many baby boomers with their children in tow, reveled back. By the time Joel reached his third song, the defiant “Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song),” the entire arena was chanting the lyrics along with him. Joel was the man who had moved out; but he’d returned to the fold with tales to share with those who’d never left. — Letta Tayler, Newsday, Jan. 31, 1998

‘The Downeaster Alexa’

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SET LIST

(Jan. 29, 1998)

Prelude/Angry Young Man

Allentown

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Just the Way You Are

Stiletto

Big Man on Mulberry Street

The Downeaster Alexa

Pressure

All About Soul

The Longest Time

My Life

Summer, Highland Falls<

I Go to Extremes

Everybody Has a Dream

New York State of Mind

Lullabye (Goodnight, My Angel)

River of Dreams

We Didn’t Start the Fire

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

Only the Good Die Young

Scenes from an Italian Restaurant

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

Captain Jack

You May Be Right

Piano Man

Sept. 25 & 27, Oct. 11 & 13, 2002 (4 shows) Face2Face
Photo credit: AP / Ed Betz

Sept. 25 & 27, Oct. 11 & 13, 2002 (4 shows)

Face2Face

These were the shows at the Coliseum that solidified Billy Joel’s comeback. In the months leading up to this tour with Elton John, Joel had dealt publicly with the worst problems of his career. He had gone through a well-publicized stint in rehab and high-profile traffic accidents, as well as a respiratory infection that had some questioning his ability to perform.

On this tour, he put those issues behind him and started to have fun again. Years later, Joel remembers joking around with John, telling him, “You know I grew up about 15 minutes from here.” He laughs as he recalls John saying, “Yes, I threw up about 15 minutes from here.”

“I thought it was hysterical,” Joel says. “I couldn’t stop laughing the whole night.”

By the numbers

  • Year-end ranking of Joel and John in Billboard’s top-grossing tours 3
  • No. 1 songs in the set 4
  • Cost of prime ticket $175
  • Length of show, in minutes 210
  • Total gross for 2002 Face2Face tour $66 million
Set list

Review

Fear not, Billy Joel fans. The Piano Man is doing just fine.

At any given moment in the 3 ½-hour ‘Face to Face Tour’ extravaganza, the 53-year-old Rock and Roll Hall of Famer from Hicksville could be found riding his piano stool like a bucking bronco, step-dancing atop his baby grand like he was Michael Flatley, Lord of the Dance, or swinging between the pianos like they were the parallel bars and he wanted a perfect 10 from the East German judge.

Or maybe he just wanted a perfect 10 from his fans.

— Glenn Gamboa, Newsday, Sept. 26, 2002 (reviewing the Madison Square Garden show)

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SET LIST

(Sept. 25, 2002)

JOEL & JOHN:

Your Song / Just the Way You Are / Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me

JOHN SET:

Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding

Someone Saved My Life Tonight

Philadelphia Freedom

I Want Love

Rocket Man

Take Me to the Pilot

Have Mercy on the Criminal

Tiny Dancer

This Train Don’t Stop There Anymore

I’m Still Standing

Crocodile Rock

JOEL SET:

Prelude/Angry Young Man

Scenes From an Italian Restaurant

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Allentown

The Downeaster Alexa

Lullabye (Goodnight, My Angel)

River of Dreams

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

New York State of Mind

I Go to Extremes

It’s Still Rock ‘n’ Roll to Me

Only the Good Die Young

JOEL & JOHN:

My Life

The Bitch Is Back

You May be Right

Bennie and the Jets

A Hard Day’s Night

Great Balls of Fire

ENCORES:

Candle in the Wind

Piano Man

Aug. 4, 2015 (1 show) Nassau Coliseum closer
Photo credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara

Aug. 4, 2015 (1 show)

Nassau Coliseum closer

Long Island said goodbye to the Old Barn Tuesday night, as Billy Joel played his 32nd — and final — show at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum.

Of course, the evening was more than just a celebration of the Hicksville native, playing his first solo show here in 17 years. It was a raucous, rowdy love-in tinged with sadness for the soon-to-be-renovated arena — as well as for its beloved Islanders, who are heading west to Brooklyn.

The Coliseum, which has hosted music royalty from Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash to the Grateful Dead in its 43-year life, will be prepped for a $261 million renovation starting Wednesday, with partial demolition set to begin at the end of the month.

“If they don’t name a road after me, that’s fine. I’d rather be alive.” — Billy Joel, talking to the crowd about a proposal to rename a quarter-mile stretch of Route 107 in Hicksville.

There are not enough words to describe [how great the show was]. – Joel Weisinger of Mount Sinai, who attended with wife Kathleen and son Corey

Billy being Billy. – Paul Caracciolo, on the highpoint of the concert.

By the numbers

  • Minutes the show took to sell out 5
  • Average ticket price $89.50
  • Number of times Joel has played the Coliseum, including final show 32
  • Estimated cost of Coliseum renovation $261 million
Set list
Billy Joel bids farewell to Nassau Coliseum

Newsday Staff and Nassau Coliseum

Long Islanders’ Billy Joel memories

I first saw Billy Joel in February 1972 in the city where he was third billing after Captain Beefheart. … My date gave me his Cold Spring Harbor album before it was even released. I attended concerts at CWP, Nassau Coliseum and MSG. I was at the last play at Shea and would love to go to the last one at Nassau. Will always love my Billy. — Lin Fritz Katz, via Facebook

I was hanging out at the Old Curiosity Shoppe having lunch before work, and Billy walks in and orders a beer, then orders two more for myself and the bartender. Well one turned to two… then three. I ended up calling in sick and had a great afternoon talking with him. — Kenneth Ponsiek, via Facebook

I lived in East Hampton in the ’80s and ’90s. When Alexa Ray was a little girl, I would from time to time see Billy coming out of the North Main Street IGA. He would go in to get those long strips of lollipops for Alexa. It always struck me as so sweet, seeing her so happy and Billy loving the moment. — Lisa Waygood, via Facebook

Review

Billy Joel’s final show at the original Nassau Coliseum was one for the ages, a three-hour marathon thrill-ride that touched on nearly every part of his career, as well as the arena’s 43-year history.


Joel craftily inserted the Beatles’ “A Hard Day’s Night” into his “River of Dreams,” and Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll” into a roaring “You May Be Right” – nods to Paul McCartney, who played the Coliseum several times, as well as Zeppelin, who was one of the arena’s first big rock concerts. But the true skill came in the way the Hicksville native built the show specifically for a Long Island crowd – whether he was talking about fights he had in a Northport restaurant or his first gig at Holy Family Church in Hicksville or his decision to play “Captain Jack,” a song normally reserved for his Philadelphia concerts, because it enable Joel to sing about taking you to “your special island.”

The unpredictability of the setlist made it feel like an intimate club show where the performer knows pretty much everyone in the club rather than a massive arena concert. Only at the Coliseum would an early combination of the jazzy “Zanzibar” and the soaring “Summer, Highland Falls” make sense – a way for Joel to telegraph within the first five songs that this was going to be a unique evening.

This was a show by (mostly) Long Islanders for Long Islanders to celebrate the area — and, apparently, to get fans to cheer “Let’s go Islanders!” a lot.

Joel even called his special guest Paul Simon “a fellow Long Islander,” a distinction Long Islanders understand about the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer from Queens. Their connection was delightfully deep, born out of a long-term friendship rather than music collaboration, which Simon pointed out did not exist outside a jokey version of “Silver Bells” they did with Steve Martin for “Saturday Night Live” one year. It was tender during “Homeward Bound,” but truly came to life during “Late in the Evening,” where Joel had a great piano solo and his band, especially the horn section of Mark Rivera, Carl Fischer and Crystal Taliefero, got to stretch and show off a bit.

After Simon and “King of Queens” star Kevin James made their appearances, Joel got the chance to relax a bit and show off some as well. He gave an emotional performance of “Goodnight Saigon,” punctuated by military personnel filling the stage to sing the chorus with him as the crowd chanted “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!” He offered a nice bit of misdirection starting off “My Life” with a bit of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” And before leading the sing-along of “Piano Man,” Joel seemed to shake off a bit of nerves and kid around by playing a bit of Stephen Foster’s “Old Folks at Home.”

“Home” was a big topic Tuesday night. Yes, Joel gave the “Hard Day’s Night” line, “When I’m home, everything seems to be right” a little extra zing. But it went deeper than that. Throughout his career, Joel has chronicled his home – whether it’s the Brenda & Eddies he grew up with in Hicksville in “Scenes from an Italian Restaurant” or the baymen of the East End in “The Downeaster ‘Alexa’.”

Joel could tell that the capacity crowd at the Coliseum Tuesday night was on edge. (All the booing for Gov. Andrew Cuomo was probably a good hint.) They were angry about losing the Islanders and the Coliseum, about losing part of their home.

Sure, the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum will be back in December 2016, after a $261 million renovation. There will be countless improvements – hopefully including an air conditioning system that doesn’t require sweating concertgoers to fan each other for relief like they did Tuesday night. It will, no doubt, be better, but it won’t be the same. It won’t be The Barn. It won’t be home.

Joel’s show offered concertgoers one more memory at The Barn. He offered them plenty of moments to hang on to — from his flouncy, hands-on-hips delivery of “Uptown Girl” to the surprising release of his inner Robert Plant during “Rock and Roll” matched nicely by guitarist Tommy Byrnes unleashing his inner Jimmy Page. Joel offered them consolation in a time of upsetting change. He left them feeling all right. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday, Aug. 5, 2015

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SET LIST

Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)

Zanzibar

Summer, Highland Falls

Everybody Loves You Now

No Man’s Land

Just the Way You Are

The Entertainer

I Do/The Lion Sleeps Tonight/Still of the Night

The Longest Time

Downeaster Alexa

Me and Julio (with Paul Simon)

Homeward Bound (with Paul Simon)

Late in the Evening (with Paul Simon)

Ballad of Billy the Kid

New York State of Mind

Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)

Until the Night

Allentown

Goodnight Saigon

Keeping the Faith

She’s Always a Woman

My Life

Captain Jack

I’ve Loved These Days

River of Dreams

Hard Days Night

Scenes from an Italian Restaurant

Piano Man

ENCORES

It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me

Uptown Girl

Big Shot

You May Be Right

Rock and Roll (Led Zeppelin cover)

Only the Good Die Young

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