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TODAY'S PAPER
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Wade Boggs

Wade Boggs

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Third baseman INDUCTED: 2005 (91.9%, first season on ballot) CAREER: 1982-1999 IN NY: 1993-1997 Boggs was a 12-time All-Star, won eight Silver Sluggers, two Gold Gloves and finished in the top-20 of AL MVP voting seven times. He batted .328 in 18 seasons, leading the AL five times and MLB three times. Boggs also had a career .415 OBP and led MLB in OBP six times. He led the AL in intentional walks every season from 1987-1992. Boggs, who played his first 11 seasons with the rival Red Sox, batted .273 with two home runs in six postseasons, winning the 1996 World Series with the Yankees.

Jack Chesbro

Jack Chesbro

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Highlanders (Yankees) POSITION: Starting pitcher INDUCTED: 1947, elected in 1946 (by Old Timers Committee) CAREER: 1899-1909 IN NY: 1903-1909 Chesbro went 198-132 with a 2.68 ERA and 1.15 WHIP in 11 seasons with the Pirates, Highlanders and Red Sox. The righthander led the NL with 28 wins in 1902 and led MLB with 41 wins in 1904, when he produced a 1.82 ERA while pitching in 55 games (51 starts, 48 complete games, 454 2/3 innings). Of his 392 games, Chesbro started 332 and finished 260, picking up 35 shutouts. He also sprinkled in five saves.

Earle Combs

Earle Combs

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Centerfield INDUCTED: 1970 (by Veterans Committee) CAREER: 1924-1935 IN NY: 1924-1935 Combs batted .325 with a .397 OBP in 12 seasons. He led the AL with 231 hits in 1927 and led the league in triples three times. A .350 hitter in four World Series, Combs won three rings with the Yankees.

Bill Dickey

Bill Dickey

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Catcher INDUCTED: 1954 (80.2%, 9th year on ballot) CAREER: 1928-1943, 1946 IN NY: 1928-1943, 1946 An 11-time All-Star, Dickey finished in the top 20 of AL MVP voting nine times. The runner-up to Boston’s Jimmie Foxx in 1938, Dickey hit .313 with a .412 OBP and 27 home runs. Dickey had a .313 average, .382 OBP and 202 home runs in 17 seasons. He played in eight World Series with the Yankees, winning seven and hitting .255 with five home runs.

Whitey Ford

Whitey Ford

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Starting pitcher INDUCTED: 1974 (77.8%, 2nd year on ballot) CAREER: 1950-1967 IN NY: 1950, 1953-1967 Edward Charles “Whitey” Ford won the AL Cy Young award in 1961, earned six World Series rings with the Yankees, led the AL in wins three times, led MLB in ERA twice and was selected to 10 All-Star games. Nicknamed “The Chairman of the Board”, the lefthander finished his 16-year career 236-106 with a 2.75 ERA. In 22 World Series starts, he was 10-8 with a 2.71 ERA. He was named World Series MVP in 1961 when he went 2-0 with a 0.00 ERA in two starts.

Lou Gehrig

Lou Gehrig

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: First base INDUCTED: 1939 (by special election) CAREER: 1923-1939 IN NY: 1923-1939 Henry Louis Gehrig, nicknamed “The Iron Horse,” was a two-time AL MVP, six-time World Series winner with the Yankees, seven-time All-Star and the 1934 batting champion with a .363 average. He led MLB in home runs in 1931, 1934 and 1936. Gehrig led the AL in RBIs five times, runs four times, OBP four times, walks three times, doubles twice and hits once. He batted .340 with a .447 OBP and 493 home runs in 17 seasons, starting a then-record 2,130 consecutive games until he took himself out of the lineup because of his fading skills, which were a result of his battle with ALS. His “luckiest man” speech at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939, transcended the sport.

Lefty Gomez

Lefty Gomez

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Starting pitcher INDUCTED: 1972 (by Veterans Committee) CAREER: 1930-1943 IN NY: 1930-1942 Vernon Louis “Lefty” Gomez led the American League in wins, ERA and strikeouts in 1934 and 1937, won five World Series with the Yankees and was selected to seven All-Star games. The southpaw went 189-102 with a 3.34 ERA in 14 seasons, leading the AL in shutouts and strikeouts three times and earning three top-10 MVP finishes. In seven World Series starts, Gomez was 6-0 with a 2.86 ERA.

Waite Hoyt

Waite Hoyt

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Starting pitcher INDUCTED: 1969 (by Veterans Committee) CAREER: 1918-1938 IN NY: 1918 with Giants, 1921-30 with Yankees, 1932 and 1937-38 with Dodgers Hoyt went 237-182 with a 3.59 ERA in 21 seasons. The righthander achieved his success despite striking out just 2.9 batters per nine innings. Hoyt won an AL-best 22 games in 1927. The following season he won 23 games with an MLB-best eight saves, leading to a 10th-place finish on the AL MVP ballot. Hoyt pitched in seven World Series, winning three with the Yankees, and going 6-4 with a 1.83 ERA in 12 games (11 starts).

Miller Huggins

Miller Huggins

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Manager INDUCTED: 1964 (by Veterans Committee) CAREER: 1913-1929 IN NY: 1918-1929 Huggins led the Yankees to six AL pennants and three World Series titles (1923, 1927, 1928). He was 1,413-1,134 overall, including 1,067-719 in 12 seasons with the Yankees, a .597 winning percentage. Huggins’ best team was the 1927 Yankees, who went 110-44 and featured a fearsome lineup branded “Murderer’s Row.”

Catfish Hunter

Catfish Hunter

AP

SPORT: Baseball TEAM: Yankees POSITION: Starting pitcher INDUCTED: 1987 (76.3%, 3rd year on ballot) CAREER: 1965-1979 IN NY: 1975-1979 James Augustus “Catfish” Hunter won the 1974 AL Cy Young award while pitching for the Oakland Athletics and turned that platform year into a five-year free agent deal with the Yankees. Hunter was declared a free agent via arbitration due to contractual issues with the A’s and his fight paved the way for widespread free agency in the sport, changing baseball’s financial landscape. On the field, the righthander was an eight-time All-Star and five-time World Series winner. Hunter won three consecutive titles with Oakland from 1972-74 and captured back-to-back championships with the Yankees in 1977 and 1978. He went 224-166 with a 3.26 ERA in 15 seasons.