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News 12 Coverage

TWA Flight 800: Remembering the tragedy

On the evening of July 17,1996, a TWA jet bound for Paris exploded shortly after taking off from Kennedy Airport, killing all 230 aboard and raining debris over the Atlantic Ocean south of the Moriches Inlet. In the ensuing days and months, Newsday covered the disaster and recovery efforts. Here, we look back at Newsday’s Pulitzer-winning coverage and catch up with some of the victims’ families and first responders forever changed by this event.

Darkness, then a wall of fire

Our story

Darkness, then a wall of fire

Newsday reporter and photographer recall sadness and horror of late-night boat ride through the wreckage.

Then and now: Families and first responders

Crash changed life, career path

Heidi Snow Cinader

Crash changed life, career path

'The most important thing ended up being…ensuring that other people don’t have to go through their loss alone.'

Courtesy of Heidi Snow Cinader

Among first to crash site

Peter Turner

Among first to crash site

'It feels like it's an unresolved story'

Courtesy of Peter Turner

Mobilized first responders

Greg Miglino

Mobilized first responders

'When you hear that there may only be a few survivors.. emotionally it takes a toll on you.'

Courtesy of Greg Miglino

Psychologist helps grieving families

Thomas DeMaria

Psychologist helps grieving families

'I’m always impressed that people pull together and stay together.'

Courtesy of Thomas DeMaria

A niece misses her uncle

Wendy Sander

A niece misses her uncle

'He was very good at making people feel better about themselves.'

Courtesy of Wendy Sander

Sister overcame struggles before crash

Mark Griffith

Sister overcame struggles before crash

'At some point, you’ve just got to let go.'

Courtesy of Mark Griffith

LIers still haunted by Flight 800

The legacy

LIers still haunted by Flight 800

'It shook our town up.'

AP / Bebeto Matthews

The crash of TWA Flight 800

Newsday's original story from 1996

The crash of TWA Flight 800

Trans World Airlines Flight 800 had climbed to approximately 13,800 feet when federal aviation officials lost radar contact on July 17, 1996.

Newsday / John Paraskevas

Some LIers still think Flight 800 was shot down

The missile theory lingers

Some LIers still think Flight 800 was shot down

'I think the government has to do some explaining.'

AFP/ JON LEVY

'More than its share of sadness'

Montoursville

'More than its share of sadness'

Pennsylvania town that lost 21 residents still hurts 20 years later.

Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

Learning from tragedy

Flight 800 lives on

Learning from tragedy

Wreckage from TWA Flight 800 is used to teach investigators how to solve accidents and prevent future ones.

Archive: Newsday special section

Archive: Newsday special section

Coverage of the TWA Flight 800 crash from July 19, 1996.

More coverage

Flying with fear

Archive: Newsday coverage from 1996

Flying with fear

AP / Wally Santana

FBI appeals to witnesses after crash

Archive: Newsday coverage from 1996

FBI appeals to witnesses after crash

Newsday / Bill Davis

In the morgue, somber tasks

Archive: Newsday coverage from 1996

In the morgue, somber tasks

AP / Cliff Schiappa

Boaters brave the dark sea looking for survivors

Archive: Newsday coverage from 1996

Boaters brave the dark sea looking for survivors

Newsday / John Paraskevas

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