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NFL DRAFT

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1st round

No. 23 pick overall

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DB

Budda Baker

Washington

Height: 5-9 5/8 | Weight: 195

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Baker is a very fun safety to watch. He’s incredibly aggressive, is a very good tackler and has great sideline-to-sideline range, speed and quickness (4.45-second 40, 6.76 three-cone, 4.08-second shuttle at the Combine). He’s good both in coverage and as a run-stopper. But at 5-9 5/8 and 195 pounds, Baker doesn’t have great size, which could lead to durability issues if he keeps up this style of play.

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Draft Baker
DL

Derek Barnett

Tennessee

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 259

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Barnett had 33 sacks and 52 tackles for loss in three seasons. He switched back and forth between both defensive end spots as needed, and on film you can see how he uses his active hands to shed blockers and disrupt plays in the backfield. The Vols ran an aggressive style of defense, however, so Barnett will need to show that his production was a product of talent rather than scheme.

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Draft Barnett
OL

Garett Bolles

Utah

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 297

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Bolles’ backstory may be one of the most intriguing in this class. A troubling childhood led to him being kicked out of his father’s home. His lacrosse coach took him in and imposed strict rules to get Bolles back on track. Bolles did just that, and now he is a potential first-round pick. He’s athletic and plays with a mean streak. At 25, he’ll be on the older side for a rookie, and he has just one year of FBS experience, but the talent – and personal drive – are there.

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Draft Bolles
DL

Caleb Brantley

Florida

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 307

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Brantley hopes to become the third Florida defensive lineman to be drafted in the last two seasons. Brantley is a stout interior lineman and has experience playing either one- or three-technique defensive tackle. That’s in spite of his 6-2 5/8, 307-pound frame, which is somewhat small for a defensive tackle. But smaller defensive tackles have succeeded in recent years, most notably Aaron Donald and Geno Atkins.

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Draft Brantley
DL

Taco Charlton

Michigan

Height: 6-5 5/8 | Weight: 277

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Michigan tied Alabama for the fewest yards allowed per game in 2016, and it started on a defensive line led by Charlton. Charlton has great size (6-5 5/8, 277 pounds) and a high motor. His 4.92 40 at the Combine was slower than expected, but he still has enough speed to get after the quarterback or pursue the ballcarrier as well as the versatility to line up as a base defensive end or inside as a three-technique tackle on passing downs.

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Draft Charlton
DB

Gareon Conley

Ohio State

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 195

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Marshon Lattimore gets all the first-round attention, but Conley, who lined up across from him, could be worthy of a first-round pick as well. The 6-foot Conley is a balanced corner with the length to handle bigger receiver in press coverage and the speed and agility (4.44-second 40 at the Combine, 6.68 three-cone) to keep up with them down the field. He could get a little better in run support and against screens, but his coverage skills should get him drafted early.

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Draft Conley
RB

Dalvin Cook

Florida State

Height: 5-10 3/8 | Weight: 210

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Cook was a big-play Seminole. The junior averaged 6.49 yards per carry in his career, had four games with 200 or more rushing yards and scored 46 touchdowns in 38 games. He’s an elusive back with home-run potential, but two things have slowed him down – nagging injuries and off-field concerns (he was found not guilty of battery in 2015 after a woman alleged Cook punched her in the face).

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Draft Cook
LB

Zach Cunningham

Vanderbilt

Height: 6-3 1/2 | Weight: 234

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Just four Vanderbilt defenders have been drafted since 2012. Cunningham is a well-rounded, athletic linebacker with great range and a nose for the ball. He’s prone to the occasional missed tackle, and he’s a little on the leaner side at 6-3 1/2 and 234 pounds, but he can play inside or outside and be a true three-down linebacker.

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Draft Cunningham
WR

Corey Davis

Western Michigan

Height: 6-2 7/8 | Weight: 209

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There might not be a more well-rounded receiver in this draft than Davis. The senior dominated at Western Michigan, catching 331 passes for 5,278 yards and 52 touchdowns in four seasons. He showed a polished skillset by running great routes, using his size to catch contested throws and beating receivers downfield. He didn’t run at the Combine after undergoing minor ankle surgery, but he’s expected to be OK for camp and could make a receiver-needy team very happy.

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Draft Davis
LB

Jarrad Davis

Florida

Height: 6-1 3/8 | Weight: 238

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Davis was the unquestioned leader of Florida’s defense. The 6-1 3/8, 238-pounder is as high-motor as they come, bringing a fiery leadership to the Gators. He’s athletic, rangy and strong and excels in every phase. He has had his share of injuries, missing the end of his senior season, the Senior Bowl and Combine workouts with an ankle injury. Davis sometimes gets caught up in traffic when pursuing the ballcarrier, but he has the combination of athleticism and leadership that teams want.

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Draft Davis
TE

Evan Engram

Ole Miss

Height: 6-3 3/8 | Weight: 234

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More teams are asking their tight ends to line up as receivers. Engram has plenty of experience doing that. He’s very athletic with great hands, and his speed (4.42 seconds in the 40 at the Combine) makes him a matchup problem – he’s too fast to cover when lined up against a linebacker, but too big for cornerbacks when he’s split out wide. He’ll find regular playing time in that latter role as he doesn’t have the size to regularly take on blockers in-line.

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Draft Engram
LB

Reuben Foster

Alabama

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 229

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Foster was the heart of Alabama’s defense. Foster is a complete player and a fit for most NFL schemes. He can cover, stop the run and blitz. He measured 6-foot and 229 pounds at the Combine, though, and he’ll face questions about what happened at Indianapolis that weekend – he was sent home early after an incident with a hospital worker.

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Draft Foster
DL

Charles Harris

Missouri

Height: 6-2 3/4 | Weight: 253

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Missouri has produced quite a few notable pass-rushers in Shane Ray, Markus Golden and Aldon Smith. Harris hopes to join them. He’s an instinctive rusher who has a bunch of pass-rush moves in his toolbox, the best of which is a nasty spin move that puts blockers on their heels. He’s still a work in progress in the run game, and he ran a slower-than-expected 4.82 seconds in the 40, but he could contribute as a sub-package rusher in the short-term.

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Draft Harris
TE

O.J. Howard

Alabama

Height: 6-5 3/4 | Weight: 251

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Howard totaled 1,412 receiving yards and four touchdowns in 44 non-national title games. In two national championship appearances, he had 314 yards and three touchdowns. He showcased excellent athleticism, hands and a well-rounded skillset in those two games, which put him on the NFL radar. Since then, he impressed at the Senior Bowl and the Combine to headline a deep tight end class. His underutilization at Alabama was more about scheme than anything else. 

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Draft Howard
DB

Marlon Humphrey

Alabama

Height: 6-0 1/4 | Weight: 197

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Humphrey is the latest in a long line of Alabama defensive backs to give the NFL a shot. He’s a former track athlete who anchored the Crimson Tide’s 4x400-meter relay as a freshman and won the 110 hurdles and 400 hurdles at the 2013 World Youth Track & Field Championships. That speed and explosion translates to the field, and he also has the physicality to line up across from bigger receivers. He’s still a little raw in terms of technique.

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Draft Humphrey
DB

Adoree' Jackson

USC

Height: 5-10 | Weight: 186

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Jackson was a two-sport star at USC, earning All-American status in the long jump in 2015 and 2016 and competed in Olympic trials last year. He may not need to resort to a second career, though, as he excelled at both cornerback and receiver for the Trojans (18 passes defensed and 37 receptions). He has the hands and awareness to match his incredible athleticism.

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Draft Jackson
DB

Sidney Jones

Washington

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 186

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Jones was widely considered to be in the top tier of this cornerback class. After all, he had nine interceptions and 30 passes defensed in three years. Then he tore his Achilles during Washington’s pro day, which sent his draft stock spiraling. That doesn’t change his film grade – Jones still has excellent instincts and technique – but the long recovery means he may miss most, if not all, of the 2017 season.

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Draft Jones
WR

Zay Jones

East Carolina

Height: 6-2 1/8 | Weight: 201

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Jones starred in a pass-happy offense at East Carolina but showed scouts at the Senior Bowl that he’s more than just a system receiver. Jones runs clean routes and has excellent hands, very good speed (4.45-second 40 at the Combine) and good size (6-2 1/8 and 202 pounds). He’s not very physical for someone of his size, but his skillset and technique should help him find a home right away as a slot receiver.

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Draft Jones
DB

Desmond King

Iowa

Height: 5-9 7/8 | Weight: 201

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Not many defensive backs are as technically sound as King, who had 14 interceptions in four seasons (eight in 2015). King reportedly ran a 4.51-second 40 at his Pro Day after skipping the drill at the Combine, but he still may not be big or fast enough to handle NFL receivers from the line of scrimmage, meaning he could be better suited as a ball-hawking free safety.

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Draft King
DB

Kevin King

Washington

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 200

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King often was overshadowed in Washington’s excellent secondary, but he lit up the Combine and greatly boosted his draft stock. The 6-3 King clocked a 4.43-second 40, 6.56-second three-cone and a 3.89-second shuttle and posted a 39 1/2-inch vertical. He has nearly all the measurables that teams want in an outside cornerback, but he could stand to add some weight to deal with bigger NFL receivers.

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Draft King
QB

DeShone Kizer

Notre Dame

Height: 6-4 1/4 | Weight: 233

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Kizer stepped into Notre Dame’s starting role in 2015 after a season-ending ankle injury to Malik Zaire. Since then, the redshirt sophomore has shown big-time arm strength and great mobility to go with his prototypical frame. However, he often suffered from glaring accuracy woes and was benched several times last season. Still, he has the measurables teams look for in a quarterback.

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Draft Kizer
OL

Forrest Lamp

Western Kentucky

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 309

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Justin Pugh and Zack Martin are recent examples of good college tackles becoming great NFL guards. Lamp hopes to follow their lead. Like Pugh and Martin, Lamp starred at left tackle in college, making 48 of his 51 starts on the blind side. He’s very athletic and can handle quicker pass-rushers and stronger run-stoppers. But, again like Pugh and Martin, Lamp’s 32 1/4-inch arms mean a move inside to guard is necessary. If history is any indication, he should be just fine.

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Draft Lamp
DB

Marshon Lattimore

Ohio State

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 193

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Lattimore, considered to be the top overall cornerback in this class, has excellent athleticism – his 4.36-second 40, 38 1/2-inch vertical and 11-foot broad jump all were top-five for defensive backs. He only has one year of starting experience, though, and has battled hamstring issues throughout his college career.

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Draft Lattimore
DL

Carl Lawson

Auburn

Height: 6-1 3/4 | Weight: 261

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When healthy, Lawson is tough to block. He recorded 14 1/2 sacks and 24 1/2 tackles for loss in three seasons, including nine sacks and 14 TFLs last year. He can bend the edge when getting after the quarterback and has a good mix of speed and power. Lawson had a torn ACL as a freshman and battled a hip injury as a sophomore, so his medical checks will be important. But he stayed healthy as a junior and finally put it all together.

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Draft Lawson
QB

Patrick Mahomes II

Texas Tech

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 225

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Mahomes is the epitome of a “high-ceiling, low-floor” quarterback. The junior has ideal size, mobility and arm strength, and his gunslinger mentality and ability to improvise helps him make near-impossible throws look routine. On the other hand, he played in a spread-happy offense that had no structure, so he’ll need to learn how to play in a pro-style scheme and may best be suited sitting behind an established veteran for a year or two.

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Draft Mahomes
RB

Christian McCaffrey

Stanford

Height: 5-11 1/4 | Weight: 202

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McCaffrey is more than just the son of former Super Bowl champion wide receiver Ed McCaffrey. He’s a Swiss Army knife in human form. The former Heisman finalist has the vision to find running lanes between the tackles and on the outside. He can catch passes out of the backfield, out wide or in the slot. He’s a dynamic return man. The question is: Does he have the size to be a three-down back, or is he a high-end complementary piece?

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Draft McCaffrey
DL

Malik McDowell

Michigan State

Height: 6-6 1/4 | Weight: 295

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McDowell’s potential is just as big as his mammoth frame. The junior moves very well for a 6-6 1/4, 295-pound interior lineman and has great athleticism, highlighted by his 4.85 40 at the Combine. He’s also versatile enough to play any spot on the defensive line. But he’s still very raw technique-wise, had quite a few hot-and-cold moments on tape and reportedly didn’t interview well. The question is, which team will fall in love with that potential?

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Draft McDowell
LB

Takkarist McKinley

UCLA

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 250

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UCLA has had five linebackers drafted since 2014, including two last year and three in the first two rounds. This former defensive end is a speedy, athletic edge rusher with a non-stop motor. He needs some work as a run defender, and he had shoulder surgery after the Combine to repair a torn labrum, but the pass-rush skillset is there for him to be a solid 3-4 outside linebacker.

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Draft McKinley
LB

Raekwon McMillan

Ohio State

Height: 6-1 7/8 | Weight: 240

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McMillan was a consensus five-star recruit in 2013 and quickly became an important player in Ohio State’s physical defense. He’s a smart, physical inside linebacker who takes very good angles to the ballcarrier and always seems to be involved in the play. He has his limitations in coverage, but if a team is looking for a run-stuffing, instinctive presence at middle linebacker, McMillan may be the best bet.

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Draft McMillan
DB

Obi Melifonwu

UConn

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 224

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Every year, somebody puts up numbers at the Combine that leave everybody in complete awe. This year, it was Melifonwu. Melifonwu posted a 44-inch vertical and an 11-9 broad jump, both tops among all defensive backs, and ran a 4.40-second 40. Oh, and he did all that at 6-3 7/8 and 224 pounds. The four-year starter is an in-the-box safety who brings the hammer in run support, but he’ll need to translate his incredible athletic gifts better while in coverage.

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Draft Melifonwu
TE

David Njoku

Miami (Fla.)

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 246

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Jeremy Shockey. Kellen Winslow Jr. Greg Olsen. Jimmy Graham. Could David Njoku be the latest Miami tight end to reach NFL stardom? The 6-4, 246-pounder has the athleticism – his 11-1 in the broad jump, 37 1/2-inch vertical and 6.97 three-cone at the Combine all were among the top three for the position, and while his 4.64 40 was slow compared to the rest of the group it’s still quite fast. He only played two seasons in Miami, so there’s still room to grow, but the measurables are there.

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Draft Njoku
DB

Jabrill Peppers

Michigan

Height: 5-10 7/8 | Weight: 213

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Peppers may be the most polarizing player at any position in this class. The Heisman finalist was an important chess piece for Michigan, with head coach Jim Harbaugh estimating Peppers played 13 positions on defense, offense and special teams last season. He’ll have a more refined role in the NFL, but the question is: Which one? Is he an athletic but undersized linebacker, or is he a safety with coverage limitations and an inability to force turnovers (just one in three seasons)?

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Draft Peppers
OL

Ryan Ramczyk

Wisconsin

Height: 6-5 5/8 | Weight: 310

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Wisconsin boasts seven offensive linemen currently on NFL rosters. Ramczyk could make it eight. Ramczyk joined the Badgers in 2015 after two seasons in Division III, but he redshirted in 2015 and first saw action last season. He finished as Pro Football Focus’ top run-blocking tackle and allowed just one sack and eight pressures in 14 games, according to the advanced stats website. He underwent hip surgery after the season, but he’s a well-rounded blocker who can be a long-time left tackle.

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Draft Ramczyk
LB

Haason Reddick

Temple

Height: 6-1 1/2 | Weight: 237

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Reddick has shot up draft boards all offseason, to the point where he could be the first linebacker taken. The former defensive end projects as a speedy linebacker (his 4.52-second 40 would have been second among linebackers behind Jabrill Peppers). He also can line up outside to rush the passer or slide inside in coverage, like Lawrence Timmons or Jamie Collins. And like them, Reddick is a bit undersized at 6-1 1/2 and 237 pounds, but his speed makes him a threat on every play.

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Draft Reddick
OL

Cam Robinson

Alabama

Height: 6-6 1/4 | Weight: 322

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Alabama has made a habit of producing big, hulking run-blockers, and Robinson is the latest. Robinson has a lot of power behind his 6-6 1/4, 322-pound frame, which he uses well in the run game. He still needs some work in pass protection, but he could start right away at right tackle or inside at guard until he develops better habits.

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Draft Robinson
WR

John Ross

Washington

Height: 5-10 3/8 | Weight: 188

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Ross can run nearly half the length of a football field in the time it took you to read this sentence. Ross set the Combine record with a 4.22-second 40, breaking Chris Johnson’s nine-year old mark of 4.24 seconds. That speed was evident on film as Ross got open on both short crossers and go routes. Off-field medicals will be very important – he has had multiple knee surgeries and underwent shoulder surgery shortly after the Combine.

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Draft Ross
DB

Teez Tabor

Florida

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 199

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Tabor is about as feisty as they come. The 6-0 1/2, 199-pound junior isn’t afraid to mix it up with opposing receivers at the line, and he’s quick enough to mirror their routes. Straight-line speed is a major concern, however: while he was never expected to be the fastest cornerback at the Combine, he ran a 4.62-second 40 in Indianapolis, then reportedly ran in the 4.7s at his pro day. He also was suspended twice while at Florida, which may scare teams off.

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Draft Tabor
DL

Solomon Thomas

Stanford

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 273

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Thomas entered the draft radar midway through last season, and a big Sun Bowl (a sack, plus the decisive stop on the final two-point conversion attempt) helped solidify his spot in the first round. At 6-2 5/8 and 273 pounds, he’s a base 4-3 end with the combination of speed (4.69 in the 40) and power to make plays. He can slide inside on passing downs, though he doesn’t have the length or size to do so on a regular basis.

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Draft Thomas
QB

Mitchell Trubisky

North Carolina

Height: 6-2 1/8 | Weight: 222

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In September 2015, Trubisky found himself as North Carolina’s second-string QB. The starter? Marquise Williams, currently a free agent. But Trubisky thrived when given the reins as a junior in 2016, completing 68 percent of his passes and showing that he can make any throw. But last year is the only real tape of him, so there’s more projection than usual with his evaluation. His Sun Bowl struggles against Stanford also are notable, but the upside is there.

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Draft Trubisky
QB

Deshaun Watson

Clemson

Height: 6-2 1/2 | Weight: 221

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College resumes don’t get much more decorated than Watson’s – two-time Heisman finalist, two national championship appearances, one national championship and a litany of other awards. The junior played big on the big stage, throwing for a combined 845 yards, seven touchdowns and one interception in both national title games. But his 32 career interceptions have led to accuracy and decision-making questions, and he’ll need to show he can handle a traditional NFL offense after operating in Clemson’s spread scheme.

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Draft Watson
LB

T.J. Watt

Wisconsin

Height: 6-4 1/2 | Weight: 252

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It’s unfair to compare T.J. Watt to his oldest brother J.J, a three-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year, but the two have several similarities beyond DNA. T.J. tested in the top half of linebackers in nearly every Combine drill, but like J.J, he’s more than just a workout warrior, notching 11 1/2 sacks in his only season as a starter and showing excellent speed, power and a tireless motor. Like J.J., T.J. is equally as good rushing the passer as he is defending the run.

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Draft Watt
DB

Tre'Davious White

LSU

Height: 5-11 1/4 | Weight: 192

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White could have been an early-round pick last year but chose to stay for his senior season and still could be drafted fairly high. White, a four-year starter, has a good combination of athleticism (4.47-second 40, 32-inch vertical, 6.90-second three-cone and 9-11 broad jump), technique and ball skills (six interceptions, 34 passes defensed). At just 194 pounds, he could get a little stronger to handle bigger receivers, but he could be a very nice outside corner to start.

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Draft White
DB

Marcus Williams

Utah

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 202

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Williams started 30 games in three seasons for Utah and showed why he’s one of the top safeties in this class. The junior has good size (6-0 5/8, 202 pounds) and speed (4.56 seconds) as well as a 43 1/2-inch vertical. More impressive are his range and ball skills – he had 11 interceptions and 19 passes defensed.

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Draft Williams
WR

Mike Williams

Clemson

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 218

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Clemson has produced a lot of top NFL receivers in recent seasons, most notably DeAndre Hopkins, Sammy Watkins and Martavis Bryant. Williams could join that group. Williams came back from a scary neck injury two years ago to lead the Tigers in catches (98), receiving yards (1,361) and receiving touchdowns (11). He has excellent size and is physical against opposing cornerbacks. He didn’t run at the Combine, though, which only fueled questions about his lack of speed.

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Draft Williams
LB

Tim Williams

Alabama

Height: 6-2 7/8 | Weight: 244

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Williams was a talented pass-rusher on a stacked Alabama defense. Williams has very good length at 6-2 7/8, and his 10-4 broad jump at the Combine confirmed his explosiveness off the snap. While he does need work as a run defender, he is improving. Williams’ off-field concerns are a bigger red flag, though -- he was charged in September with carrying a pistol without a permit and admitted at the Combine to multiple failed drug tests.

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Draft Williams
DB

Quincy Wilson

Florida

Height: 6-1 1/2 | Weight: 211

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Wilson isn’t as flashy as Florida teammate Teez Tabor, but he’s just as effective. The 6-1 1/2, 211-pound Wilson has an ideal frame, good ball skills (six interceptions and 14 passes defensed in three seasons) and plays very physically, making him a good fit for press-man schemes. That physicality sometimes can backfire, and he may end up being flagged quite a bit for defensive holding, but he has the tools to be a good outside corner.

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Draft Wilson

2nd round

No. 55 pick overall

SELECT YOUR POSITION

SELECT A PLAYER

DL

Montravius Adams

Auburn

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 304

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Adams was a highly touted recruit in high school, but he really put it all together last year. He’s a disruptive, powerful tackle with good size and explosion. He also impressed during Senior Bowl week, putting in consistently strong workouts. But that’s the big question with Adams – that inconsistency was what kept him back before his senior season, so he’ll need to show that he can keep that switch flipped “on” when he reaches the NFL.

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Draft Adams
LB

Ryan Anderson

Alabama

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 253

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Anderson was somewhat overshadowed at Alabama, but that doesn’t make him any less of an NFL prospect. Playing alongside Reuben Foster and Tim Williams and behind Jonathan Allen, Anderson collected a team-high 19 tackles for loss as well as 61 tackles, nine sacks, four forced fumbles and three fumble recoveries. He’s a balanced linebacker who can rush the passer, stop the run and cover despite his fairly limited athleticism.

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Draft Anderson
DB

Chidobe Awuzie

Colorado

Height: 5-11 7/8 | Weight: 202

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Awuzie’s versatility is his calling card. The 5-11 7/8, 202-pounder has the tenacity to play outside cornerback, the quickness to line up inside in nickel packages and the instincts to play safety. He’s also very good at sniffing out screens and helping in run support, and can be counted on as a blitzer at times. He only had three interceptions in four seasons, but he’ll quickly find a role for whoever drafts him, no matter what they draft him to be.

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Draft Awuzie
DB

Budda Baker

Washington

Height: 5-9 5/8 | Weight: 195

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Baker is a very fun safety to watch. He’s incredibly aggressive, is a very good tackler and has great sideline-to-sideline range, speed and quickness (4.45-second 40, 6.76 three-cone, 4.08-second shuttle at the Combine). He’s good both in coverage and as a run-stopper. But at 5-9 5/8 and 195 pounds, Baker doesn’t have great size, which could lead to durability issues if he keeps up this style of play.

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Draft Baker
DL

Caleb Brantley

Florida

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 307

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Brantley hopes to become the third Florida defensive lineman to be drafted in the last two seasons. Brantley is a stout interior lineman and has experience playing either one- or three-technique defensive tackle. That’s in spite of his 6-2 5/8, 307-pound frame, which is somewhat small for a defensive tackle. But smaller defensive tackles have succeeded in recent years, most notably Aaron Donald and Geno Atkins.

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Draft Brantley
TE

Jake Butt

Michigan

Height: 6-5 1/2 | Weight: 246

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If not for a torn ACL in his final college game, Butt could have been mentioned as a potential first-rounder in a very deep tight end class. The Mackey Award winner is a reliable, sure-handed option who makes tough catches over the middle. He’s a prototypical in-line “safety blanket” who could help a young quarterback’s growth. His torn ACL in the Orange Bowl means he may not be ready to play right away, though.

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Draft Butt
DB

Gareon Conley

Ohio State

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 195

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Marshon Lattimore gets all the first-round attention, but Conley, who lined up across from him, could be worthy of a first-round pick as well. The 6-foot Conley is a balanced corner with the length to handle bigger receiver in press coverage and the speed and agility (4.44-second 40 at the Combine, 6.68 three-cone) to keep up with them down the field. He could get a little better in run support and against screens, but his coverage skills should get him drafted early.

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Draft Conley
WR

Amara Darboh

Michigan

Height: 6-1 5/8 | Weight: 214

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Darboh didn’t light up the Big Ten with gaudy stats in any of his four years at Michigan, but he was a consistent producer, especially in his final two seasons. Darboh had 57 catches for 862 yards and seven touchdowns and regularly got open as Michigan’s top receiver last year. He could make an NFL living on underneath routes and in red-zone situations, though he doesn’t have breakaway speed and will fall victim to a few bad drops every now and then.

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Draft Darboh
LB

Jarrad Davis

Florida

Height: 6-1 3/8 | Weight: 238

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Davis was the unquestioned leader of Florida’s defense. The 6-1 3/8, 238-pounder is as high-motor as they come, bringing a fiery leadership to the Gators. He’s athletic, rangy and strong and excels in every phase. He has had his share of injuries, missing the end of his senior season, the Senior Bowl and Combine workouts with an ankle injury. Davis sometimes gets caught up in traffic when pursuing the ballcarrier, but he has the combination of athleticism and leadership that teams want.

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Draft Davis
OL

Dion Dawkins

Temple

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 314

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Dawkins started at left tackle for Temple and was a key member of the Owls’ turnaround from 2-10 in 2013 to 10-4 in 2016. He has good size at 6-3 7/8 and 314 pounds and is powerful in tight spaces. He could play tackle or guard in the NFL, depending on which team drafts him, though guard may be the better bet because of his powerful run-blocking.

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Draft Dawkins
WR

Malachi Dupre

LSU

Height: 6-2 1/2 | Weight: 196

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Three years ago, LSU produced a pair of NFL wideouts in Odell Beckham Jr. and Jarvis Landry. They have two NFL-caliber receivers this year in Dupre and Travin Dural, but Dupre is expected to hear his name called first. Dupre tracks the ball well and uses his 6-2 1/2 frame to make 50-50 catches. He only caught 98 passes for 1,609 yards and 14 touchdowns in three seasons, but that was more about scheme and poor quarterback play.

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Draft Dupre
OL

Pat Elflein

Ohio State

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 303

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Elflein is beginning his NFL career just as another former Ohio State center’s NFL career is in its twilight. Yes, Elflein does have a similar playing style as former Jet Nick Mangold – both have very good size (Elflein is 6-2 5/8, 303 pounds), are smart enough to make calls at the line and are excellent at both opening up running lanes and protecting their quarterback. Elflein has the added bonus of being able to play guard. Like Mangold, he could be a franchise center for many years.

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Draft Elflein
TE

Evan Engram

Ole Miss

Height: 6-3 3/8 | Weight: 234

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More teams are asking their tight ends to line up as receivers. Engram has plenty of experience doing that. He’s very athletic with great hands, and his speed (4.42 seconds in the 40 at the Combine) makes him a matchup problem – he’s too fast to cover when lined up against a linebacker, but too big for cornerbacks when he’s split out wide. He’ll find regular playing time in that latter role as he doesn’t have the size to regularly take on blockers in-line.

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Draft Engram
DB

Justin Evans

Texas A&M

Height: 5-11 5/8 | Weight: 199

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Evans transferred to Texas A&M in 2015 and made an instant impact in the Aggies’ secondary. He’s a balanced defender who can enforce the middle of the field and defend the deep pass as a single-high safety. He can get too aggressive and bite on play-fakes and sometimes will go for the big hit instead of the safe wrap-up tackle. He also could add a little more weight to help when he plays up in the box against the run.

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Draft Evans
TE

Gerald Everett

South Alabama

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 239

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No player from South Alabama has ever been drafted. Everett could change that.  The 6-3, 239-pound UAB transfer has 4.62 speed and is tough to cover anywhere he lines up because of his size and big catch radius. He’s also not afraid to take defenders out as a blocker, making him a little more well-rounded than other tight ends in this class. He’s still learning the finer points of route-running, but he has the potential to be a solid starter in time.

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Draft Everett
OL

Dan Feeney

Indiana

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 305

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Feeney’s blocking helped spring Tevin Coleman to a 2,036-yard season in 2014 and Jordan Howard to a 1,213-yard one a year later. He’s also very adept in pass protection and allowed just one sack in 310 called pass attempts, according to Indiana’s website. He also has some experience at right tackle, starting five games there in 2016.

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Draft Feeney
RB

D'Onta Foreman

Texas

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 233

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Don’t let his bulky frame trick you into thinking he’s just a power back. Foreman is surprisingly fast for someone of his size (6-foot, 233 pounds). The junior didn’t run at the Combine because of a slight stress fracture in his foot, but on tape he consistently races past defenders. Foreman had 323 carries last season, but for all the talk about how he looks like a bulldozer, he doesn’t break many tackles for a running back his size.

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Draft Foreman
RB

Wayne Gallman

Clemson

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 215

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Deshaun Watson got most of the attention in Clemson’s high-powered offense, but Gallman was a huge contributor to the Tigers’ two runs to the national championship game. The junior is a tough runner with good speed and knows how to finish runs. He’s also a very good pass-protector, which will get him on the field earlier. He’s better off-tackle than up the middle, but he still could be a valuable committee member early while developing into an eventual starter.

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Draft Gallman
OL

Antonio Garcia

Troy

Height: 6-6 1/4 | Weight: 302

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Troy isn’t exactly a hotbed of offensive line talent -- just one lineman has ever been drafted. Garcia could change that. The 6-6 1/4, 302-pound left tackle impressed during Senior Bowl workouts and has a good mix of athleticism and technique. He could stand to add some bulk, but based on what he brings to the table right now, he could be a plug-and-play left tackle.

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Draft Garcia
WR

Carlos Henderson

Louisiana Tech

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 199

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When Henderson has the ball in his hands, watch out. The big-play receiver is a dynamo after the catch and a threat to take any slant route to the house. He ran a 4.46-second 40 at the Combine, and while he’s not a big target at 5-11 and 199 pounds, he has shown that he can play outside receiver when needed. He only assumed a starting job last year, which may be a concern, but his ability to take the top off a defense will get him drafted.

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Draft Henderson
TE

Bucky Hodges

Virginia Tech

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 257

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Hodges is a wide receiver in a tight end’s body. He has an unbelievable mix of size (6-6, 257 pounds) and athleticism (his 11-2 broad jump was a Combine record for tight ends, his 39 1/2-inch vertical was tops for this year’s tight end group and he ran an impressive 4.57-second 40). That makes him a perfect red-zone target and field stretcher. He’s still very raw as a route runner, often getting by on just athleticism, but his skillset and measurables will help him see the field early.

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Draft Hodges
RB

Elijah Hood

North Carolina

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 232

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Two years ago, Hood rushed for 1,463 yards and 17 touchdowns as a sophomore at North Carolina. Since then, injuries slowed him down a bit. He dealt with a concussion last season, missed his final two games with an undisclosed medical condition, then missed the Combine with a strained hamstring. He’s a good back when healthy, but lately it seems that is something that may need to be monitored.

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Draft Hood
DB

Adoree' Jackson

USC

Height: 5-10 | Weight: 186

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Jackson was a two-sport star at USC, earning All-American status in the long jump in 2015 and 2016 and competed in Olympic trials last year. He may not need to resort to a second career, though, as he excelled at both cornerback and receiver for the Trojans (18 passes defensed and 37 receptions). He has the hands and awareness to match his incredible athleticism.

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Draft Jackson
DB

Eddie Jackson

Alabama

Height: 6-0 3/8 | Weight: 201

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Jackson hauled in nine interceptions in four seasons, but he has flown under the radar in a deep safety class because of a broken leg last October. When healthy, the converted cornerback is a smart, rangy pass defender with good athleticism and punt-return abilities. He did play behind a lot of future NFL talent in Nick Saban, but the former captain could be a solid NFL free safety if his medicals come back clean.

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Draft Jackson
OL

Dorian Johnson

Pittsburgh

Height: 6-4 7/8 | Weight: 300

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Johnson, like his teammate Adam Bisnowaty, is a tough, well-rounded blocker. He’s consistent in his technique, has good athleticism and is balanced enough to help in both the run and pass games. At 300 pounds, he could add bulk to handle stronger interior linemen, but he’s very sound otherwise and could become a fixture at guard for a team.

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Draft Johnson
DL

Jaleel Johnson

Iowa

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 316

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Iowa allowed 10 rushing touchdowns in 13 games, and much of that was due to Johnson in the middle. Johnson is a disruptive interior force, and he uses hands very well as both a run-stopper and pass-rusher. He sometimes has problems going up against double teams, mostly because of his high pad level and inability to establish a solid anchor, but his motor and explosiveness could catch the eye of NFL teams.

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Draft Johnson
DB

Sidney Jones

Washington

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 186

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Jones was widely considered to be in the top tier of this cornerback class. After all, he had nine interceptions and 30 passes defensed in three years. Then he tore his Achilles during Washington’s pro day, which sent his draft stock spiraling. That doesn’t change his film grade – Jones still has excellent instincts and technique – but the long recovery means he may miss most, if not all, of the 2017 season.

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Draft Jones
WR

Zay Jones

East Carolina

Height: 6-2 1/8 | Weight: 201

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Jones starred in a pass-happy offense at East Carolina but showed scouts at the Senior Bowl that he’s more than just a system receiver. Jones runs clean routes and has excellent hands, very good speed (4.45-second 40 at the Combine) and good size (6-2 1/8 and 202 pounds). He’s not very physical for someone of his size, but his skillset and technique should help him find a home right away as a slot receiver.

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Draft Jones
QB

Brad Kaaya

Miami (Fla.)

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 214

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Kaaya could be this year’s Christian Hackenberg – a quarterback once considered a potential first-round pick after a stellar freshman season but now on the outside looking in. The junior comes from a pro-style system at Miami, and he has shown he can make full-field reads — something many young QBs lack coming out of college. But the pocket passer has an average arm, limited mobility and sometimes struggles when facing extra pressure.

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Draft Kaaya
RB

Alvin Kamara

Tennessee

Height: 5-10 1/4 | Weight: 214

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Kamara began his college career at Alabama, which regularly churns out NFL running backs. But a preseason knee injury and a suspension for the Sugar Bowl eventually led to him leaving Tuscaloosa without ever playing. Kamara spent a year at a community college before joining Tennessee. He didn’t see the field much for the Vols (284 career touches in two seasons), but he was dynamic with the ball in his hands, averaging seven yards per touch.

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Draft Kamara
DB

Desmond King

Iowa

Height: 5-9 7/8 | Weight: 201

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Not many defensive backs are as technically sound as King, who had 14 interceptions in four seasons (eight in 2015). King reportedly ran a 4.51-second 40 at his Pro Day after skipping the drill at the Combine, but he still may not be big or fast enough to handle NFL receivers from the line of scrimmage, meaning he could be better suited as a ball-hawking free safety.

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Draft King
DB

Kevin King

Washington

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 200

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King often was overshadowed in Washington’s excellent secondary, but he lit up the Combine and greatly boosted his draft stock. The 6-3 King clocked a 4.43-second 40, 6.56-second three-cone and a 3.89-second shuttle and posted a 39 1/2-inch vertical. He has nearly all the measurables that teams want in an outside cornerback, but he could stand to add some weight to deal with bigger NFL receivers.

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Draft King
WR

Cooper Kupp

Eastern Washington

Height: 6-1 5/8 | Weight: 204

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Playing at FCS Eastern Washington didn’t stop Kupp from having huge games on big stages. The 2015 Walter Payton Award winner averaged nine catches, 157.2 receiving yards and 2.4 touchdowns in five games against FBS opponents. His 428 catches, 6,464 yards and 73 TDs are FCS records and would be FBS records. Kupp is an excellent route-runner and has exceptional hands, but he doesn’t have great speed (4.62 in the 40) and will be a 24-year-old rookie.

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Draft Kupp
DB

Jourdan Lewis

Michigan

Height: 5-10 1/4 | Weight: 188

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Lewis was the personification of Michigan’s tough, scrappy defense. The consensus All-American has great technique and a nose for the ball. He measured 5-10 1/4 and 188 pounds at the Combine, so some teams may view him strictly as a slot corner, though we have seen small, technically sound corners such as Jason Verrett thrive outside. He pleaded not guilty to a domestic violence charge in March, so teams may factor that into their evaluations.

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Draft Lewis
QB

Patrick Mahomes II

Texas Tech

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 225

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Mahomes is the epitome of a “high-ceiling, low-floor” quarterback. The junior has ideal size, mobility and arm strength, and his gunslinger mentality and ability to improvise helps him make near-impossible throws look routine. On the other hand, he played in a spread-happy offense that had no structure, so he’ll need to learn how to play in a pro-style scheme and may best be suited sitting behind an established veteran for a year or two.

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Draft Mahomes
LB

Raekwon McMillan

Ohio State

Height: 6-1 7/8 | Weight: 240

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McMillan was a consensus five-star recruit in 2013 and quickly became an important player in Ohio State’s physical defense. He’s a smart, physical inside linebacker who takes very good angles to the ballcarrier and always seems to be involved in the play. He has his limitations in coverage, but if a team is looking for a run-stuffing, instinctive presence at middle linebacker, McMillan may be the best bet.

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Draft McMillan
DB

Obi Melifonwu

UConn

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 224

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Every year, somebody puts up numbers at the Combine that leave everybody in complete awe. This year, it was Melifonwu. Melifonwu posted a 44-inch vertical and an 11-9 broad jump, both tops among all defensive backs, and ran a 4.40-second 40. Oh, and he did all that at 6-3 7/8 and 224 pounds. The four-year starter is an in-the-box safety who brings the hammer in run support, but he’ll need to translate his incredible athletic gifts better while in coverage.

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Draft Melifonwu
RB

Joe Mixon

Oklahoma

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 228

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If we’re strictly talking on-field talent, Mixon is among the top echelon of running backs in this class. He’s an all-purpose back with great size, speed and hands. But it’s not that simple. Mixon was suspended for the 2014 season after punching a woman in the face (video of the incident surfaced last December). In a league that’s increasingly sensitive to domestic violence, when and where will a team be willing to take a massive PR hit and gamble on his immense talent?

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Draft Mixon
DB

Fabian Moreau

UCLA

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 206

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Moreau’s athleticism easily could have been overlooked on a UCLA defense filled with future NFL talent. Moreau has nice size at 6-0 1/2 and 206 pounds, and his 4.35-second 40 at the Combine ranked second among all defensive backs. He also has good hops (38-inch vertical), and his 11-4 broad jump is indicative of his explosive ability. He only had three interceptions in five seasons, though, and needed surgery after tearing his pectoral while doing the bench press at UCLA’s pro day.

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Draft Moreau
OL

Taylor Moton

Western Michigan

Height: 6-5 1/4 | Weight: 319

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Moton is a durable, versatile run-blocker, starting 39 combined games at right tackle in 2013, 2014 and 2016, with 13 starts at right guard in 2015. He tested very well at the Combine, jumping 30 1/2 inches in the vertical and 9-1 in the broad jump, and has excellent power off the snap. He’s strictly a right tackle or right guard in the NFL, but he can play either one well.

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Draft Moton
RB

Samaje Perine

Oklahoma

Height: 5-10 5/8 | Weight: 233

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Perine burst onto the national scene as a freshman when he ran for an FBS-record 427 yards against Kansas. From there, he became a premier back, even when in a timeshare with Joe Mixon last season. Perine runs with excellent power and good speed and is very tough to tackle. He’s not the most elusive back in this draft, but he can create a little for himself.

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Draft Perine
OL

Ethan Pocic

LSU

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 310

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Someone had to create holes for Leonard Fournette. Pocic started 37 games for LSU (27 at center, 9 at right guard, 1 at left tackle). The Tigers had a 1,000-yard rusher in each of Pocic’s three full seasons as a starter and a 100-yard rusher in 28 of his 37 starts. Pocic’s a smart blocker, and his versatility will appeal to several teams, but he could get a little stronger to handle bigger NFL defensive linemen.

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Draft Pocic
DL

Elijah Qualls

Washington

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 313

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Qualls is one of several intriguing Washington defenders in this draft class. At 6-0 5/8 and 313 pounds, he’s a stout nose tackle who excels against the run. He can fit in a 4-3 defense as a one-technique – as was the case at Washington – or as a pure nose tackle in a 3-4, two-gap scheme. He’s not a great pass-rusher, though, and sometimes gets stuck on blocks.

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Draft Qualls
LB

Duke Riley

LSU

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 232

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Riley is one of two talented LSU inside linebackers in this draft class. Whereas his teammate Kendell Beckwith is a better run-stopper, Riley projects more like the guy he replaced: Deion Jones. Riley is a rangy coverage linebacker who flies across the field. At 6-0 1/2 and 232 pounds, he’s not the big, imposing presence that Beckwith is, but we saw Jones have success with the Falcons last year as a rookie, so it’s not unreasonable to think Riley, in the right system, could similarly thrive.

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Draft Riley
DL

Derek Rivers

Youngstown State

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 248

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1992 was the last time an NFL team drafted a Youngstown State player. Rivers could change that this year. He paired with fellow Penguins prospect Avery Moss to wreak havoc off the edge, then turned heads at the Senior Bowl. Rivers is a relentless rusher who explodes off the snap, but he’ll need to show he can handle the jump up in competition.

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Draft Rivers
RB

Curtis Samuel

Ohio State

Height: 5-10 5/8 | Weight: 196

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Samuel didn’t start at running back at Ohio State until after Ezekiel Elliott left, but he was an important cog in a potent Buckeyes offense well before then. The Brooklyn native played H-back and was a dynamic all-purpose threat. He doesn’t have ideal bell-cow back size, but he could carve out a spot in a versatile Shane Vereen-esque role for an NFL team, or even convert full-time to receiver.

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Draft Samuel
WR

JuJu Smith-Schuster

USC

Height: 6-1 3/8 | Weight: 215

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USC receivers have been somewhat stigmatized by their predecessors, several of whom were never able to live up to their college success once reaching the NFL. Smith-Schuster will try to buck that perception. He has good size and acceleration and can play physically when needed, but he sometimes has issues with separation due to his average speed. He’ll be a 20-year-old rookie, though, so he’ll have a little more time than others to grow into his body.

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Draft Smith-Schuster
DL

Dawuane Smoot

Illinois

Height: 6-3 1/8 | Weight: 255

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Smoot brings a different skillset to the NFL than former Illini defensive end Jihad Ward, who went in the second round last year, but he could be drafted just as high. Smoot is an agile “Leo” pass-rusher with a great first step. He regressed a little in 2016 after a strong junior season and needs some work as a run defender, but he has the tools to be a useful rotational rusher out of the gate.

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Draft Smoot
WR

ArDarius Stewart

Alabama

Height: 5-11 1/8 | Weight: 204

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Alabama is known more for its run game, but they still had some good receiving targets in Stewart and O.J. Howard. Stewart led the Crimson Tide with 864 receiving yards last season, and even though he measured just under 6-foot at the Combine, he was an explosive, sure-handed option for freshman QB Jalen Hurts. He also plays with a feisty attitude. Combine that with his aforementioned size and explosion, and it’s hard not to think of Stewart as a new-age Steve Smith.

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Draft Stewart
DB

Cameron Sutton

Tennessee

Height: 5-11 1/4 | Weight: 188

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Sutton was a very productive cornerback at Tennessee, owning the school’s all-time record for passes defensed (37). He’s a fluid athlete, good at sticking with receivers in man coverage and can return punts. But at 5-11 1/4 and 188 pounds, he’ll have trouble against more physical wideouts and may be best in the slot. He also suffered a fractured ankle early last season but returned for the end of the Vols’ season.

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Draft Sutton
WR

Ryan Switzer

North Carolina

Height: 5-8 1/2 | Weight: 181

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If you’re looking for a quintessential slot receiver in this class, Switzer fits that bill and then some. In addition to being a reliable target, the UNC product has the added value of returning punts, finishing one shy of Wes Welker’s career mark of eight. Indeed, Switzer’s game is reminiscent of Welker’s, a diminutive receiver and dynamic return man with excellent route-running abilities. But at his size, Switzer likely will have to stay in those defined roles to make it in the NFL.

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Draft Switzer
DB

Teez Tabor

Florida

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 199

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Tabor is about as feisty as they come. The 6-0 1/2, 199-pound junior isn’t afraid to mix it up with opposing receivers at the line, and he’s quick enough to mirror their routes. Straight-line speed is a major concern, however: while he was never expected to be the fastest cornerback at the Combine, he ran a 4.62-second 40 in Indianapolis, then reportedly ran in the 4.7s at his pro day. He also was suspended twice while at Florida, which may scare teams off.

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Draft Tabor
DB

Cordrea Tankersley

Clemson

Height: 6-1 1/4 | Weight: 199

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Tankersley was a key member of both of Clemson’s trips to the national championship. He’s a productive corner with great size (6-1 1/4, 199 pounds) and ball skills (nine interceptions, 22 passes defensed in 55 games). He sometimes gets a little too grabby downfield, which will lead to flags in the NFL, but the traits and production are there.

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Draft Tankersley
WR

Taywan Taylor

Western Kentucky

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 203

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The last time a Western Kentucky wide receiver was drafted was in 1980. Taylor likely will break that drought. He can play outside or in the slot, and while he’s not a burner, he uses his speed to beat his man and create after the catch. He’ll need to show that he can handle tougher competition than he faced at Western Kentucky, but the physical tools are there.

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Draft Taylor
LB

Anthony Walker Jr.

Northwestern

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 238

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Walker Jr. burst onto the scene as a sophomore in 2015, notching 122 tackles (20 1/2 for loss) en route to consensus first-team All-Big Ten honors. He’s a physical, downhill tackler who is very good against the run. He’s not very athletic and can struggle against the pass, but he could be a useful option for a team in need of some run defense help until he develops into a more complete player.

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Draft Walker
DL

DeMarcus Walker

Florida State

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 280

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Seven Florida State defensive linemen were drafted between 2013 and 2016. The streak ended last year, but Walker could help the Seminoles start a new one. He’s a big, versatile defensive lineman in the Michael Bennett mold who can hold the edge against the run and get after the quarterback on passing downs. He’s a bit of a tweener, though – he’s not particularly athletic enough to be a full-time defensive end, but at 280 pounds, he’d need to bulk up to play three-technique defensive tackle.

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Draft Walker
DL

Carlos Watkins

Clemson

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 309

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Clemson has become a defensive line factory in recent seasons – Shaq Lawson, Kevin Dodd, D.J. Reader, Vic Beasley, Grady Jarrett and Mallichiah Goodman all were picked in the last two drafts. Watkins is a big, athletic lineman who can play either one- or three-technique position. He does play with a high pad level, which allows blockers to push him around, but he could carve out a role as a rotational player.

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Draft Watkins
QB

Davis Webb

Cal

Height: 6-4 5/8 | Weight: 229

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Webb transferred to Cal from Texas Tech last season as a grad student. His task: Replace last year’s No. 1 overall pick, Jared Goff. While he won’t go first overall like his predecessor, Webb still threw for 4,295 yards and 37 touchdowns. Webb won Senior Bowl MVP in January and showed a few promising tools in Mobile, but accuracy issues and inexperience in a pro-style system portend a big learning curve.

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Draft Webb
DB

Tre'Davious White

LSU

Height: 5-11 1/4 | Weight: 192

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White could have been an early-round pick last year but chose to stay for his senior season and still could be drafted fairly high. White, a four-year starter, has a good combination of athleticism (4.47-second 40, 32-inch vertical, 6.90-second three-cone and 9-11 broad jump), technique and ball skills (six interceptions, 34 passes defensed). At just 194 pounds, he could get a little stronger to handle bigger receivers, but he could be a very nice outside corner to start.

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Draft White
DB

Marcus Williams

Utah

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 202

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Williams started 30 games in three seasons for Utah and showed why he’s one of the top safeties in this class. The junior has good size (6-0 5/8, 202 pounds) and speed (4.56 seconds) as well as a 43 1/2-inch vertical. More impressive are his range and ball skills – he had 11 interceptions and 19 passes defensed.

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Draft Williams
DL

Chris Wormley

Michigan

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 298

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Wormley doesn’t get as much hype as teammate Taco Charlton, but he’s also a good NFL prospect. Wormley has very good size at 6-5 and 298 pounds and is versatile enough to play five-technique end in a 3-4 scheme or three-technique tackle in a 4-3. He does need to be more consistent, sometimes disappearing after flashing a good play, but the size and versatility help his case.

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Draft Wormley

3rd round

No. 87 pick overall

SELECT YOUR POSITION

SELECT A PLAYER

DL

Montravius Adams

Auburn

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 304

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Adams was a highly touted recruit in high school, but he really put it all together last year. He’s a disruptive, powerful tackle with good size and explosion. He also impressed during Senior Bowl week, putting in consistently strong workouts. But that’s the big question with Adams – that inconsistency was what kept him back before his senior season, so he’ll need to show that he can keep that switch flipped “on” when he reaches the NFL.

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Draft Adams
LB

Ryan Anderson

Alabama

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 253

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Anderson was somewhat overshadowed at Alabama, but that doesn’t make him any less of an NFL prospect. Playing alongside Reuben Foster and Tim Williams and behind Jonathan Allen, Anderson collected a team-high 19 tackles for loss as well as 61 tackles, nine sacks, four forced fumbles and three fumble recoveries. He’s a balanced linebacker who can rush the passer, stop the run and cover despite his fairly limited athleticism.

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Draft Anderson
DB

Chidobe Awuzie

Colorado

Height: 5-11 7/8 | Weight: 202

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Awuzie’s versatility is his calling card. The 5-11 7/8, 202-pounder has the tenacity to play outside cornerback, the quickness to line up inside in nickel packages and the instincts to play safety. He’s also very good at sniffing out screens and helping in run support, and can be counted on as a blitzer at times. He only had three interceptions in four seasons, but he’ll quickly find a role for whoever drafts him, no matter what they draft him to be.

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Draft Awuzie
DB

Budda Baker

Washington

Height: 5-9 5/8 | Weight: 195

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Baker is a very fun safety to watch. He’s incredibly aggressive, is a very good tackler and has great sideline-to-sideline range, speed and quickness (4.45-second 40, 6.76 three-cone, 4.08-second shuttle at the Combine). He’s good both in coverage and as a run-stopper. But at 5-9 5/8 and 195 pounds, Baker doesn’t have great size, which could lead to durability issues if he keeps up this style of play.

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Draft Baker
OL

Zach Banner

USC

Height: 6-8 3/8 | Weight: 353

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There’s big, and then there’s Banner. Banner checked in at 6-8 3/8 and 353 pounds during the Combine, easily the biggest in both categories among everybody in attendance. That immense size, along with his 34 7/8-inch arms, help him push defenders around. He’s not a great pass-blocker, though, and he has struggled with his weight in the past, at one point reportedly weighing 385 pounds. If he can keep that in check, he could be a nice addition as a right tackle or a guard.

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Draft Banner
LB

Kendell Beckwith

LSU

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 243

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Beckwith is one of two talented LSU inside linebackers in this draft class. Teammate Duke Riley has better range and coverage skills, but Beckwith is more of a big, early-down thumper. He gets downhill quickly and is very physical against the run but can be exposed in pass defense. He tore his left ACL against Florida in mid-November, but when healthy, he’s a good run-plugging option.

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Draft Beckwith
OL

Adam Bisnowaty

Pittsburgh

Height: 6-5 5/8 | Weight: 304

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Bisnowaty is an experienced left tackle, starting 43 games in four seasons at Pitt. The 6-5 5/8, 304-pounder can clear holes in the run game and is very tough, but he has missed time with several injuries and struggles against quicker edge rushers. He could be better suited to playing right tackle or moving inside to guard, but his experience and run-blocking skills could prove useful right away.

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Draft Bisnowaty
TE

Jake Butt

Michigan

Height: 6-5 1/2 | Weight: 246

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If not for a torn ACL in his final college game, Butt could have been mentioned as a potential first-rounder in a very deep tight end class. The Mackey Award winner is a reliable, sure-handed option who makes tough catches over the middle. He’s a prototypical in-line “safety blanket” who could help a young quarterback’s growth. His torn ACL in the Orange Bowl means he may not be ready to play right away, though.

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Draft Butt
WR

KD Cannon

Baylor

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 182

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Baylor has produced a few speedy wideouts recently in Corey Coleman, Kendall Wright, Josh Gordon and Terrance Williams. Cannon is next. The junior ran a 4.41 in the 40 at the Combine, showcasing the straight-line speed that helped him rack up 3,113 receiving yards and 27 touchdowns in three seasons. He’s an improving route runner, but at 5-11 and 182 pounds, he may find some trouble against bigger NFL cornerbacks.

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Draft Cannon
RB

Corey Clement

Wisconsin

Height: 5-10 1/8 | Weight: 220

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Although he probably won’t be a first-rounder, there’s a lot to like about Clement’s game. The senior is a one-cut back who runs hard and waits for his blocks to get set up. However, he won’t get much outside of what’s already blocked for him, and at Wisconsin, he ran behind an excellent offensive line that opened up truck-sized running lanes. That rarely happens in the NFL.

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Draft Clement
WR

Amara Darboh

Michigan

Height: 6-1 5/8 | Weight: 214

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Darboh didn’t light up the Big Ten with gaudy stats in any of his four years at Michigan, but he was a consistent producer, especially in his final two seasons. Darboh had 57 catches for 862 yards and seven touchdowns and regularly got open as Michigan’s top receiver last year. He could make an NFL living on underneath routes and in red-zone situations, though he doesn’t have breakaway speed and will fall victim to a few bad drops every now and then.

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Draft Darboh
OL

Dion Dawkins

Temple

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 314

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Dawkins started at left tackle for Temple and was a key member of the Owls’ turnaround from 2-10 in 2013 to 10-4 in 2016. He has good size at 6-3 7/8 and 314 pounds and is powerful in tight spaces. He could play tackle or guard in the NFL, depending on which team drafts him, though guard may be the better bet because of his powerful run-blocking.

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Draft Dawkins
WR

Malachi Dupre

LSU

Height: 6-2 1/2 | Weight: 196

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Three years ago, LSU produced a pair of NFL wideouts in Odell Beckham Jr. and Jarvis Landry. They have two NFL-caliber receivers this year in Dupre and Travin Dural, but Dupre is expected to hear his name called first. Dupre tracks the ball well and uses his 6-2 1/2 frame to make 50-50 catches. He only caught 98 passes for 1,609 yards and 14 touchdowns in three seasons, but that was more about scheme and poor quarterback play.

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Draft Dupre
DB

Corn Elder

Miami (Fla.)

Height: 5-9 7/8 | Weight: 183

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Elder is an aggressive, instinctive defender who played both outside and in the slot at Miami and has good technique and athleticism. He’s on the smaller side at 5-9 7/8 and 183 pounds, but he plays bigger than that and is tough enough to hang with bigger possession receivers.

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Draft Elder
OL

Pat Elflein

Ohio State

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 303

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Elflein is beginning his NFL career just as another former Ohio State center’s NFL career is in its twilight. Yes, Elflein does have a similar playing style as former Jet Nick Mangold – both have very good size (Elflein is 6-2 5/8, 303 pounds), are smart enough to make calls at the line and are excellent at both opening up running lanes and protecting their quarterback. Elflein has the added bonus of being able to play guard. Like Mangold, he could be a franchise center for many years.

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Draft Elflein
TE

Evan Engram

Ole Miss

Height: 6-3 3/8 | Weight: 234

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More teams are asking their tight ends to line up as receivers. Engram has plenty of experience doing that. He’s very athletic with great hands, and his speed (4.42 seconds in the 40 at the Combine) makes him a matchup problem – he’s too fast to cover when lined up against a linebacker, but too big for cornerbacks when he’s split out wide. He’ll find regular playing time in that latter role as he doesn’t have the size to regularly take on blockers in-line.

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Draft Engram
DB

Justin Evans

Texas A&M

Height: 5-11 5/8 | Weight: 199

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Evans transferred to Texas A&M in 2015 and made an instant impact in the Aggies’ secondary. He’s a balanced defender who can enforce the middle of the field and defend the deep pass as a single-high safety. He can get too aggressive and bite on play-fakes and sometimes will go for the big hit instead of the safe wrap-up tackle. He also could add a little more weight to help when he plays up in the box against the run.

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Draft Evans
TE

Gerald Everett

South Alabama

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 239

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No player from South Alabama has ever been drafted. Everett could change that.  The 6-3, 239-pound UAB transfer has 4.62 speed and is tough to cover anywhere he lines up because of his size and big catch radius. He’s also not afraid to take defenders out as a blocker, making him a little more well-rounded than other tight ends in this class. He’s still learning the finer points of route-running, but he has the potential to be a solid starter in time.

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Draft Everett
WR

Isaiah Ford

Virginia Tech

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 194

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Ford regressed a little last season from his 1,164-yard, 11-touchdown sophomore season, but he still went over 1,000 yards and solidified his spot on the NFL radar. The junior has good short-area quickness for a taller receiver, but his slim frame could lead to issues against press coverage. He has a lower floor than some other receivers in this class, but he could become a good deep threat in time.

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Draft Ford
RB

D'Onta Foreman

Texas

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 233

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Don’t let his bulky frame trick you into thinking he’s just a power back. Foreman is surprisingly fast for someone of his size (6-foot, 233 pounds). The junior didn’t run at the Combine because of a slight stress fracture in his foot, but on tape he consistently races past defenders. Foreman had 323 carries last season, but for all the talk about how he looks like a bulldozer, he doesn’t break many tackles for a running back his size.

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Draft Foreman
RB

Wayne Gallman

Clemson

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 215

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Deshaun Watson got most of the attention in Clemson’s high-powered offense, but Gallman was a huge contributor to the Tigers’ two runs to the national championship game. The junior is a tough runner with good speed and knows how to finish runs. He’s also a very good pass-protector, which will get him on the field earlier. He’s better off-tackle than up the middle, but he still could be a valuable committee member early while developing into an eventual starter.

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Draft Gallman
OL

Antonio Garcia

Troy

Height: 6-6 1/4 | Weight: 302

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Troy isn’t exactly a hotbed of offensive line talent -- just one lineman has ever been drafted. Garcia could change that. The 6-6 1/4, 302-pound left tackle impressed during Senior Bowl workouts and has a good mix of athleticism and technique. He could stand to add some bulk, but based on what he brings to the table right now, he could be a plug-and-play left tackle.

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Draft Garcia
WR

Chris Godwin

Penn State

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 209

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Godwin exploded onto the scene in January with a 187-yard, two-touchdown game against USC in the Rose Bowl. Since then, his stock keeps climbing. Godwin impressed at the Combine, clocking a 4.42-second 40 – significantly faster than expectations given that he’s more a physical receiver than a burner. He has very good size at 6-1 and 209 pounds, as well as strong hands to make tough catches.

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Draft Godwin
WR

Chad Hansen

Cal

Height: 6-1 7/8 | Weight: 202

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Hansen checks off most of the boxes scouts look for in a receiver. He has good size (6-1 7/8, 202 pounds), speed (4.53-second 40) and hands (92 catches last season). But being an NFL receiver is more than that. While Cal’s spread offense didn’t require receivers to be as crisp with their routes, Hansen will need to show improvement in that area to get early playing time. The tools are there, he’ll just need to put them together.

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Draft Hansen
WR

Carlos Henderson

Louisiana Tech

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 199

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When Henderson has the ball in his hands, watch out. The big-play receiver is a dynamo after the catch and a threat to take any slant route to the house. He ran a 4.46-second 40 at the Combine, and while he’s not a big target at 5-11 and 199 pounds, he has shown that he can play outside receiver when needed. He only assumed a starting job last year, which may be a concern, but his ability to take the top off a defense will get him drafted.

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Draft Henderson
TE

Bucky Hodges

Virginia Tech

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 257

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Hodges is a wide receiver in a tight end’s body. He has an unbelievable mix of size (6-6, 257 pounds) and athleticism (his 11-2 broad jump was a Combine record for tight ends, his 39 1/2-inch vertical was tops for this year’s tight end group and he ran an impressive 4.57-second 40). That makes him a perfect red-zone target and field stretcher. He’s still very raw as a route runner, often getting by on just athleticism, but his skillset and measurables will help him see the field early.

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Draft Hodges
RB

Elijah Hood

North Carolina

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 232

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Two years ago, Hood rushed for 1,463 yards and 17 touchdowns as a sophomore at North Carolina. Since then, injuries slowed him down a bit. He dealt with a concussion last season, missed his final two games with an undisclosed medical condition, then missed the Combine with a strained hamstring. He’s a good back when healthy, but lately it seems that is something that may need to be monitored.

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Draft Hood
RB

Kareem Hunt

Toledo

Height: 5-10 1/2 | Weight: 216

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If there’s one “sleeper” in this running back class, it could be Hunt. The senior does everything well, from running with power, patience and vision to catching passes out of the backfield and making defenders miss in open space. However, there isn’t one singular trait that will blow anyone out of the water, which partly is why he’s not considered a first-rounder.

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Draft Hunt
DB

Eddie Jackson

Alabama

Height: 6-0 3/8 | Weight: 201

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Jackson hauled in nine interceptions in four seasons, but he has flown under the radar in a deep safety class because of a broken leg last October. When healthy, the converted cornerback is a smart, rangy pass defender with good athleticism and punt-return abilities. He did play behind a lot of future NFL talent in Nick Saban, but the former captain could be a solid NFL free safety if his medicals come back clean.

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Draft Jackson
OL

Dorian Johnson

Pittsburgh

Height: 6-4 7/8 | Weight: 300

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Johnson, like his teammate Adam Bisnowaty, is a tough, well-rounded blocker. He’s consistent in his technique, has good athleticism and is balanced enough to help in both the run and pass games. At 300 pounds, he could add bulk to handle stronger interior linemen, but he’s very sound otherwise and could become a fixture at guard for a team.

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Draft Johnson
DL

Jaleel Johnson

Iowa

Height: 6-2 5/8 | Weight: 316

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Iowa allowed 10 rushing touchdowns in 13 games, and much of that was due to Johnson in the middle. Johnson is a disruptive interior force, and he uses hands very well as both a run-stopper and pass-rusher. He sometimes has problems going up against double teams, mostly because of his high pad level and inability to establish a solid anchor, but his motor and explosiveness could catch the eye of NFL teams.

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Draft Johnson
OL

Roderick Johnson

Florida State

Height: 6-7 | Weight: 299

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Dalvin Cook’s top blocker also is an NFL hopeful. Johnson has the things that can’t be taught -- excellent height at 6-7 and long, 36-inch arms to help keep defenders at bay. But, he has a tendency to lunge from the waist instead of bending his knees in pass protection, which causes him to lose his balance and consistently get beat in pass protection. He’s more of a project than the other linemen in this class.

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Draft Johnson
WR

Zay Jones

East Carolina

Height: 6-2 1/8 | Weight: 201

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Jones starred in a pass-happy offense at East Carolina but showed scouts at the Senior Bowl that he’s more than just a system receiver. Jones runs clean routes and has excellent hands, very good speed (4.45-second 40 at the Combine) and good size (6-2 1/8 and 202 pounds). He’s not very physical for someone of his size, but his skillset and technique should help him find a home right away as a slot receiver.

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Draft Jones
QB

Brad Kaaya

Miami (Fla.)

Height: 6-3 7/8 | Weight: 214

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Kaaya could be this year’s Christian Hackenberg – a quarterback once considered a potential first-round pick after a stellar freshman season but now on the outside looking in. The junior comes from a pro-style system at Miami, and he has shown he can make full-field reads — something many young QBs lack coming out of college. But the pocket passer has an average arm, limited mobility and sometimes struggles when facing extra pressure.

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Draft Kaaya
RB

Alvin Kamara

Tennessee

Height: 5-10 1/4 | Weight: 214

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Kamara began his college career at Alabama, which regularly churns out NFL running backs. But a preseason knee injury and a suspension for the Sugar Bowl eventually led to him leaving Tuscaloosa without ever playing. Kamara spent a year at a community college before joining Tennessee. He didn’t see the field much for the Vols (284 career touches in two seasons), but he was dynamic with the ball in his hands, averaging seven yards per touch.

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Draft Kamara
WR

Cooper Kupp

Eastern Washington

Height: 6-1 5/8 | Weight: 204

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Playing at FCS Eastern Washington didn’t stop Kupp from having huge games on big stages. The 2015 Walter Payton Award winner averaged nine catches, 157.2 receiving yards and 2.4 touchdowns in five games against FBS opponents. His 428 catches, 6,464 yards and 73 TDs are FCS records and would be FBS records. Kupp is an excellent route-runner and has exceptional hands, but he doesn’t have great speed (4.62 in the 40) and will be a 24-year-old rookie.

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Draft Kupp
TE

Jordan Leggett

Clemson

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 258

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Leggett came on strong over the last two seasons at Clemson, scoring 15 touchdowns in his last 30 games. He has great size at 6-5 and 258, and just like the other players in this class, is a “move” tight end who can play in-line or out as a receiver. However, his motor may be cause for concern. He admitted he was lazy as a freshman and was given the nickname “Lazy Leggett.” He’ll need to show that he has shed that moniker for good.

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Draft Leggett
DB

Jourdan Lewis

Michigan

Height: 5-10 1/4 | Weight: 188

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Lewis was the personification of Michigan’s tough, scrappy defense. The consensus All-American has great technique and a nose for the ball. He measured 5-10 1/4 and 188 pounds at the Combine, so some teams may view him strictly as a slot corner, though we have seen small, technically sound corners such as Jason Verrett thrive outside. He pleaded not guilty to a domestic violence charge in March, so teams may factor that into their evaluations.

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Draft Lewis
RB

Jeremy McNichols

Boise State

Height: 5-8 5/8 | Weight: 214

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Boise State has two running backs in the NFL: Jay Ajayi and Doug Martin. McNichols is trying to make it three. The junior’s best attribute is his ability to contribute both as a runner and a receiver. He has the vision to find creases, but he doesn’t have great speed after he hits the hole. He could be a good committee back early in his career.

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Draft McNichols
RB

Joe Mixon

Oklahoma

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 228

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If we’re strictly talking on-field talent, Mixon is among the top echelon of running backs in this class. He’s an all-purpose back with great size, speed and hands. But it’s not that simple. Mixon was suspended for the 2014 season after punching a woman in the face (video of the incident surfaced last December). In a league that’s increasingly sensitive to domestic violence, when and where will a team be willing to take a massive PR hit and gamble on his immense talent?

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Draft Mixon
DB

Fabian Moreau

UCLA

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 206

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Moreau’s athleticism easily could have been overlooked on a UCLA defense filled with future NFL talent. Moreau has nice size at 6-0 1/2 and 206 pounds, and his 4.35-second 40 at the Combine ranked second among all defensive backs. He also has good hops (38-inch vertical), and his 11-4 broad jump is indicative of his explosive ability. He only had three interceptions in five seasons, though, and needed surgery after tearing his pectoral while doing the bench press at UCLA’s pro day.

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Draft Moreau
OL

Taylor Moton

Western Michigan

Height: 6-5 1/4 | Weight: 319

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Moton is a durable, versatile run-blocker, starting 39 combined games at right tackle in 2013, 2014 and 2016, with 13 starts at right guard in 2015. He tested very well at the Combine, jumping 30 1/2 inches in the vertical and 9-1 in the broad jump, and has excellent power off the snap. He’s strictly a right tackle or right guard in the NFL, but he can play either one well.

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Draft Moton
RB

Samaje Perine

Oklahoma

Height: 5-10 5/8 | Weight: 233

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Perine burst onto the national scene as a freshman when he ran for an FBS-record 427 yards against Kansas. From there, he became a premier back, even when in a timeshare with Joe Mixon last season. Perine runs with excellent power and good speed and is very tough to tackle. He’s not the most elusive back in this draft, but he can create a little for himself.

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Draft Perine
QB

Nathan Peterman

Pittsburgh

Height: 6-2 1/2 | Weight: 226

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In a quarterback class with not much senior talent, Peterman could be an intriguing prospect. Peterman started his career at Tennessee, but he broke his hand in the season opener his freshman year and was benched in the opener a year later. He transferred to Pitt as a grad student, where he gained valuable experience in a pro-style offense. That experience, along with his accuracy and pocket awareness, could offset his average arm and make him a good developmental quarterback.

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Draft Peterman
OL

Ethan Pocic

LSU

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 310

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Someone had to create holes for Leonard Fournette. Pocic started 37 games for LSU (27 at center, 9 at right guard, 1 at left tackle). The Tigers had a 1,000-yard rusher in each of Pocic’s three full seasons as a starter and a 100-yard rusher in 28 of his 37 starts. Pocic’s a smart blocker, and his versatility will appeal to several teams, but he could get a little stronger to handle bigger NFL defensive linemen.

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Draft Pocic
DL

Ejuan Price

Pittsburgh

Height: 5-11 3/8 | Weight: 241

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Measurables often reign supreme in the NFL Draft, but there’s room in the league for players who don’t check all the physical boxes. Take Price, who’s hoping to follow in the footsteps of shorter pass-rushers such as James Harrison and Elvis Dumervil. Price has an excellent motor, great burst and lots of productive film. But often, size will push pass-rushers into the later rounds or out of the draft altogether.

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Draft Price
RB

Donnel Pumphrey

San Diego State

Height: 5-8 1/4 | Weight: 176

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No running back has had a more productive college career than Pumphrey. The senior broke Ron Dayne’s career FBS rushing record last season with 6,405 yards. He has a very well-rounded skillset that translates well to the NFL. The issue is size: At 179 pounds, Pumphrey is 11 pounds lighter than Darren Sproles, whose role he’ll likely have to emulate in order to have a chance at NFL success.

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Draft Pumphrey
DL

Elijah Qualls

Washington

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 313

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Qualls is one of several intriguing Washington defenders in this draft class. At 6-0 5/8 and 313 pounds, he’s a stout nose tackle who excels against the run. He can fit in a 4-3 defense as a one-technique – as was the case at Washington – or as a pure nose tackle in a 3-4, two-gap scheme. He’s not a great pass-rusher, though, and sometimes gets stuck on blocks.

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Draft Qualls
LB

Duke Riley

LSU

Height: 6-0 1/2 | Weight: 232

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Riley is one of two talented LSU inside linebackers in this draft class. Whereas his teammate Kendell Beckwith is a better run-stopper, Riley projects more like the guy he replaced: Deion Jones. Riley is a rangy coverage linebacker who flies across the field. At 6-0 1/2 and 232 pounds, he’s not the big, imposing presence that Beckwith is, but we saw Jones have success with the Falcons last year as a rookie, so it’s not unreasonable to think Riley, in the right system, could similarly thrive.

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Draft Riley
DL

Derek Rivers

Youngstown State

Height: 6-3 5/8 | Weight: 248

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1992 was the last time an NFL team drafted a Youngstown State player. Rivers could change that this year. He paired with fellow Penguins prospect Avery Moss to wreak havoc off the edge, then turned heads at the Senior Bowl. Rivers is a relentless rusher who explodes off the snap, but he’ll need to show he can handle the jump up in competition.

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Draft Rivers
WR

Jalen Robinette

Air Force

Height: 6-2 7/8 | Weight: 220

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Robinette never had more than 43 catches in a season at Air Force. But before you knock him down your draft board, note that Air Force’s primary quarterback had just 108 attempts last season, compared with four players with at least 116 carries. Robinette has excellent size (6-2 7/8, 220 pounds) and 10 7/8-inch hands. He’s not a burner (4.62 40), and he needs to refine his routes, but he could be a nice sleeper in this class and a useful red-zone target.

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Draft Robinette
RB

Curtis Samuel

Ohio State

Height: 5-10 5/8 | Weight: 196

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Samuel didn’t start at running back at Ohio State until after Ezekiel Elliott left, but he was an important cog in a potent Buckeyes offense well before then. The Brooklyn native played H-back and was a dynamic all-purpose threat. He doesn’t have ideal bell-cow back size, but he could carve out a spot in a versatile Shane Vereen-esque role for an NFL team, or even convert full-time to receiver.

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Draft Samuel
WR

JuJu Smith-Schuster

USC

Height: 6-1 3/8 | Weight: 215

READ MORE

USC receivers have been somewhat stigmatized by their predecessors, several of whom were never able to live up to their college success once reaching the NFL. Smith-Schuster will try to buck that perception. He has good size and acceleration and can play physically when needed, but he sometimes has issues with separation due to his average speed. He’ll be a 20-year-old rookie, though, so he’ll have a little more time than others to grow into his body.

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Draft Smith-Schuster
DL

Dawuane Smoot

Illinois

Height: 6-3 1/8 | Weight: 255

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Smoot brings a different skillset to the NFL than former Illini defensive end Jihad Ward, who went in the second round last year, but he could be drafted just as high. Smoot is an agile “Leo” pass-rusher with a great first step. He regressed a little in 2016 after a strong junior season and needs some work as a run defender, but he has the tools to be a useful rotational rusher out of the gate.

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Draft Smoot
WR

ArDarius Stewart

Alabama

Height: 5-11 1/8 | Weight: 204

READ MORE

Alabama is known more for its run game, but they still had some good receiving targets in Stewart and O.J. Howard. Stewart led the Crimson Tide with 864 receiving yards last season, and even though he measured just under 6-foot at the Combine, he was an explosive, sure-handed option for freshman QB Jalen Hurts. He also plays with a feisty attitude. Combine that with his aforementioned size and explosion, and it’s hard not to think of Stewart as a new-age Steve Smith.

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Draft Stewart
DB

Cameron Sutton

Tennessee

Height: 5-11 1/4 | Weight: 188

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Sutton was a very productive cornerback at Tennessee, owning the school’s all-time record for passes defensed (37). He’s a fluid athlete, good at sticking with receivers in man coverage and can return punts. But at 5-11 1/4 and 188 pounds, he’ll have trouble against more physical wideouts and may be best in the slot. He also suffered a fractured ankle early last season but returned for the end of the Vols’ season.

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Draft Sutton
WR

Ryan Switzer

North Carolina

Height: 5-8 1/2 | Weight: 181

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If you’re looking for a quintessential slot receiver in this class, Switzer fits that bill and then some. In addition to being a reliable target, the UNC product has the added value of returning punts, finishing one shy of Wes Welker’s career mark of eight. Indeed, Switzer’s game is reminiscent of Welker’s, a diminutive receiver and dynamic return man with excellent route-running abilities. But at his size, Switzer likely will have to stay in those defined roles to make it in the NFL.

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Draft Switzer
DB

Cordrea Tankersley

Clemson

Height: 6-1 1/4 | Weight: 199

READ MORE

Tankersley was a key member of both of Clemson’s trips to the national championship. He’s a productive corner with great size (6-1 1/4, 199 pounds) and ball skills (nine interceptions, 22 passes defensed in 55 games). He sometimes gets a little too grabby downfield, which will lead to flags in the NFL, but the traits and production are there.

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Draft Tankersley
WR

Taywan Taylor

Western Kentucky

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 203

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The last time a Western Kentucky wide receiver was drafted was in 1980. Taylor likely will break that drought. He can play outside or in the slot, and while he’s not a burner, he uses his speed to beat his man and create after the catch. He’ll need to show that he can handle tougher competition than he faced at Western Kentucky, but the physical tools are there.

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Draft Taylor
LB

Anthony Walker Jr.

Northwestern

Height: 6-0 5/8 | Weight: 238

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Walker Jr. burst onto the scene as a sophomore in 2015, notching 122 tackles (20 1/2 for loss) en route to consensus first-team All-Big Ten honors. He’s a physical, downhill tackler who is very good against the run. He’s not very athletic and can struggle against the pass, but he could be a useful option for a team in need of some run defense help until he develops into a more complete player.

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Draft Walker
DL

Carlos Watkins

Clemson

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 309

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Clemson has become a defensive line factory in recent seasons – Shaq Lawson, Kevin Dodd, D.J. Reader, Vic Beasley, Grady Jarrett and Mallichiah Goodman all were picked in the last two drafts. Watkins is a big, athletic lineman who can play either one- or three-technique position. He does play with a high pad level, which allows blockers to push him around, but he could carve out a role as a rotational player.

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Draft Watkins
LB

T.J. Watt

Wisconsin

Height: 6-4 1/2 | Weight: 252

READ MORE

It’s unfair to compare T.J. Watt to his oldest brother J.J, a three-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year, but the two have several similarities beyond DNA. T.J. tested in the top half of linebackers in nearly every Combine drill, but like J.J, he’s more than just a workout warrior, notching 11 1/2 sacks in his only season as a starter and showing excellent speed, power and a tireless motor. Like J.J., T.J. is equally as good rushing the passer as he is defending the run.

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Draft Watt
QB

Davis Webb

Cal

Height: 6-4 5/8 | Weight: 229

READ MORE

Webb transferred to Cal from Texas Tech last season as a grad student. His task: Replace last year’s No. 1 overall pick, Jared Goff. While he won’t go first overall like his predecessor, Webb still threw for 4,295 yards and 37 touchdowns. Webb won Senior Bowl MVP in January and showed a few promising tools in Mobile, but accuracy issues and inexperience in a pro-style system portend a big learning curve.

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Draft Webb
RB

Jamaal Williams

BYU

Height: 6-0 3/8 | Weight: 212

READ MORE

Williams withdrew from BYU in 2015 for what he called “personal reasons” then came back last season and didn’t miss a beat. The senior set career highs in carries (234), yards (1,375) and average (5.9) as the focal point of the Cougars’ offense. Williams is a physical runner with good size and he keeps his feet moving after contact. He isn’t very elusive and won’t make defenders miss in the open field, but he could be a nice early-down thumper.

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Draft Williams
DL

Chris Wormley

Michigan

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 298

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Wormley doesn’t get as much hype as teammate Taco Charlton, but he’s also a good NFL prospect. Wormley has very good size at 6-5 and 298 pounds and is versatile enough to play five-technique end in a 3-4 scheme or three-technique tackle in a 4-3. He does need to be more consistent, sometimes disappearing after flashing a good play, but the size and versatility help his case.

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Draft Wormley